Overview

Title: Paul Laxalt U.S. Senatorial Papers
Creator(s): Laxalt, Paul
Collection Number: 83-01
Dates (inclusive): 1974-1987
Physical Extent: 850.0 cubic feet (34.5 cubic feet in 42 boxes available (850 cubic feet in 1001 boxes total))
Preferred Citation: Paul Laxalt U. S. Senatorial Papers, 83-01. Special Collections, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno.
Repository: University of Nevada, Reno. Special Collections Department
Permanent Link: http://dewey.library.unr.edu/xtf/view?docId=ead/83-01-ead.xml

Biographical Note

Paul Laxalt was born on August 2, 1922 at St. Mary's Hospital in Reno, Nevada to his parents Dominique and Theresa Laxalt. Like thousands of other young men from the Pyrenees region between France and Spain, Dominque Laxalt arrived in 1906 in the American West at the age of eighteen with virtually nothing to become a sheepherder. He hoped that the high deserts of the Far West would offer greater economic opportunities than the old country. For many years, Dominque herded sheep on the isolated foothills and ranges of Northern California and Nevada.

As Dominique Laxalt earned money, he bought sheep. Before too long he accumulated many sheep, which he employed others to herd for him. By the early 1920s, Dominque had become a sizeable figure in the sheep business in the West. His business dealings regularly took him to Reno where in 1921 he met Theresa Alpetche. She was in the United States seeing to her younger brother, Michel, who had been injured in a gas attack in World War I. Theresa was also from a small Basque village located about an hour's drive from where Dominque was born. Shortly after meeting, the two were married and went to live on a spacious ranch near Yerington, Nevada.

In the late 1920s, amid economic depression in the West, revenues in the sheep industry began to fall. Dominque was unable to keep up with his bank loans and was eventually forced to return to sheepherding full-time. With nowhere else to go, Theresa found herself residing with Dominque in the primitive camps in the hills working as a cook for sheepherders, ranch hands, and cowboys. After several months of that lifestyle, Theresa had enough. She heard that a small Basque hotel was available for purchase for one hundred dollars in Carson City, Nevada. Without hesitation she bought the establishment, named it the "French Hotel," and moved the then small family to Nevada's tiny capital city.

Prior to coming to the United States, Theresa had been trained at the Cordon Bleu cooking school in Paris. In addition to running a boarding house out of the hotel, she also operated a small restaurant. Dominque's job kept him away from home in the hills above Carson City for long periods of time, so Laxalt and his five younger siblings, Robert, Suzanne, John, Marie, and Peter helped their mother at the restaurant. It was there, listening to the conversations of Carson City's politicians, particularly Senator Pat McCarran, that a young Laxalt had his political awakening.

Laxalt attended Carson High School where he played on the state championship basketball team. Upon graduation from high school, Laxalt headed for college at Santa Clara University in Northern California. In the summer of 1942, after the United States entered World War II, Laxalt's education was interrupted when he joined the army. He was assigned as an army medical corpsman, and in 1944 saw combat during the Battle of Leyte Gulf in the Philippines. Following Japan's surrender in September 1945, and Laxalt's discharge, he resumed his studies at Denver University where he graduated in 1949 with a Bachelor of Arts and law degree.

Laxalt's political career began in 1950 when he took the "political plunge" by running for the position of district attorney of Ormsby County and turning out the longtime incumbent, Dick Waters. After one term, Laxalt resigned in 1954 and began practicing law, which he did for the next nine years to come. Laxalt was regarded as a capable and skilled lawyer. He took on a variety of legal cases including land and water issues disputes, and others involving some of Northern Nevada's high-profile gaming and real estate figures. Laxalt's legal career afforded him a high degree of success and publicity in Northern Nevada.

Though never overly influenced by partisan politics of either persuasion, Laxalt's first run for statewide office occurred in 1962 when he ran as a Republican for lieutenant governor against former congressman, Berkeley L. Bunker. During a campaign rally in Las Vegas, Laxalt's running partner, Republican gubernatorial candidate Rex Bell, suffered a massive heart attack and died. Republican leaders from across the state encouraged Laxalt to consider taking Bell's place, but he declined and remained in the race for lieutenant governor instead. Laxalt's family and volunteer-run grassroots, "shoe-leather" campaign in the "cow counties," coupled with an ambitious radio and television campaign aimed at Las Vegas (where he had very little name recognition) allowed him to defeat Bunker by a favorable margin. Laxalt served one term as lieutenant governor from 1963 to 1967.

Hoping for an uninterrupted term as lieutenant governor, Laxalt's wishes were disrupted halfway through his term when he entered into a tough race for a seat in the U.S. Senate against incumbent Howard Cannon. In one of the closest U.S. Senate elections ever, Cannon defeated Laxalt by just 48 votes, which immediately raised suspicion of election fraud. At the same time Laxalt was dueling with Cannon for a seat in the Senate, Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater was competing with Lyndon Johnson for the presidency. It was against this backdrop that Laxalt's unique personal and political friendship with Ronald Reagan began. The two met at a 1964 Goldwater fundraising event in California where Reagan was speaking. Two years later, both were elected as governors of their neighboring states, Nevada and California. During their governorships, the men frequently visited back and forth between Sacramento and Carson City.

Beginning in 1965, Laxalt challenged two-term Governor Grant Sawyer on a platform that promoted cooperation with the federal government on issues of investigating corruption and organized crime in Nevada's gaming industry. In the aftermath of the election, Sawyer was defeated by nearly 6,000 votes. Laxalt's tenure as governor was noted for his support of corporate ownership of gaming operations in Nevada (including Howard Hughes' purchase of multiple hotel-casinos in Las Vegas), which allowed for the establishment of Nevada's first community colleges and medical school. Laxalt, along with California Governor Ronald Reagan was integral in creating the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency to protect and conserve Lake Tahoe. His other achievements included expanding the park service, promoting prison reform in Nevada, and appointing the first African-American in Nevada's history to a cabinet-level position (Willie Wynn). Laxalt made a shocking decision when he dismissed the idea of running for reelection in 1970. He believed returning to private life would be more beneficial for himself and his relationship with his wife and kids. By that point, Laxalt admitted that he'd had a "bellyful of politics."

After leaving the governorship, Laxalt's political activity was minimal. He focused his attention instead on his family, building and opening the Ormsby House hotel-casino, and practicing law. He did remain in occasional contact with Barry Goldwater, Richard Nixon, and Ronald Reagan, but that was the extent his of political dealings during that point in this his life. Suddenly in 1973, Senator Alan Bible announced his plans to retire. In February 1974, Laxalt announced his candidacy, and easily won the Republican primary in September of the same year to face off against Democrat Harry Reid. By late 1974, however, the Republican Party was suffering from fallout created by the Watergate scandal and President Gerald Ford's subsequent pardon of Richard Nixon. Laxalt defeated Reid by a small margin of just 624 votes. At the time, given the circumstances, and the state of the Republican Party, Laxalt's victory was considered a major triumph. Senator Bible resigned three weeks early in December 1974, and Governor Mike O'Callaghan appointed Laxalt to finish out Bible's term, giving him a slight leg-up in seniority.

Laxalt's ability to accomplish much in the United States Senate during his first four years was curtailed by the fact that Republicans were the minority in both houses of Congress. Republican senate leadership rested largely in the hands of moderates or liberals. In 1975, Laxalt found himself a minority within the minority when he made the decision to endorse his friend, and former governor of California, Ronald Reagan to unseat President Ford in the looming Republican primary (it has been noted that Laxalt's political isolation during this time was made more bearable by his marriage to Carol Wilson). Laxalt was the only U.S. senator to back Reagan, serving as the chairman of his campaign. Though this decision was largely unpopular among his colleagues, polling numbers revealed that Reagan was a credible conservative candidate free of the baggage of the Washington scene. Members of the voting public gravitated toward his genuine appeal. It was a notable distinction that would pave the way for a resurrection of the Republican Party and Reagan's election to the presidency four years later in 1980. Following Reagan's narrow loss in the 1976 primary, Laxalt went on to work for the Ford campaign in the general election. Scholars have posited that Reagan's insurgency attributed to Ford's eventual loss to Jimmy Carter in November 1976.

During the Carter Administration, Laxalt found himself as the leading conservative critic of the new administration. He was responsible for opposing transfer of the Panama Canal to the Panamanian government, he also adamantly opposed legislation that allowed for "common situs picketing." His efforts thrust him into the Senate spotlight where he became a leading conservative spokesman as the 1978 midterm congressional elections approached. His efforts did attribute to an increased number of Republicans entering the Senate in 1979, though they remained the minority in both houses. Laxalt gave up on trying to fashion policy and instead focused on issues that might be used in the 1980 presidential election including the Family Protection Act, encouragement of the Sagebrush Rebellion, and promotion of the Republican Party for the 1980 election.

1980 was a big year for Laxalt, not only was he up for reelection in the Senate, but Reagan was again seeking the presidency. He did became frustrated that he was unable to spend more time participating in Reagan's presidential campaign due to his own campaign. Laxalt had spent the prior two years amid an inner circle of advisors working on behalf of Reagan's candidacy. There was serious speculation that Laxalt might be considered for the vice president slot. However, Laxalt realized that strategically, his consideration for the position was not feasible. Although Laxalt may have been Reagan's personal choice, the more moderate George H. Bush, Reagan's strongest opponent in the primary elections, was chosen as his running mate. The events of 1980 were indeed pleasing to Laxalt, not only was he reelected to the Senate by an overwhelming margin over his liberal opponent, Mary Gojack, but the Republicans gained control over the Senate for the first time since 1954, and Reagan defeated Jimmy Carter by a landslide receiving 50% of the popular vote. After Reagan's election, the media began referring to Laxalt as "the First Friend." Republicans, Laxalt included, believed that the stage was set for a great "new beginning."

In his second term in the Senate, Laxalt became a highly visible figure due to his friendship with the president and his efforts over the Panama Canal fight. Other conservatives urged him to challenge Howard Baker for the position of majority leader. Laxalt declined and instead went on to serve as the general chairman of the Republican Party beginning in 1983. He also became chairman of the powerful Appropriations Subcommittee, which had jurisdiction over the Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce. Because of this, Laxalt was included in leadership meetings with the president.

One of Laxalt's most notable victories during his period was his resistance to, and prevention of the MX missile system being located in Nevada. Another notable instance was his 1985 trip to the Philippines at the behest President Reagan. The National Security Council indicated that the country might be on the verge of a communist takeover. Laxalt was sent as an emissary to deliver a stern message to the president of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. It was the first time Laxalt had been in the Philippines in 41 years. He met with Marcos and expressed President Reagan's concerns about the political and economic instability of the Philippines. Laxalt's trip allowed him to build a rapport with Marcos, one that may have ultimately avoided a bloody civil war in the Philippines.

Laxalt was at the zenith of his political career as the 1984 election cycle began, he was the general chairman of the Republican Party, chairman for President Reagan's reelection effort, chairman of two legislative subcommittees, and the spokesman for Republican causes. Laxalt was the intermediary between the president and his senate colleagues of both parties. As Laxalt had done two times before in 1976 and 1980, he again nominated Reagan at the Republican National Convention in Dallas Texas. The convention was something Laxalt and his colleagues in the Republican National Committee had begun planning in 1982. There was very little doubt within the party that Reagan would seek reelection in 1984. Due to an economic boom, lower inflation, reduced tax rates, decreased unemployment, and a robust gross national product, Reagan and his supporters in Congress enjoyed a high degree of popularity. So certain were Republicans that Reagan would win reelection, the campaign committee largely ignored Democratic candidate and former vice president, Walter Mondale. Reagan was overwhelmingly reelected, winning the electoral votes in all but Walter Mondale's home state of Minnesota and the District of Columbia.

During his senatorial career Laxalt served on the Labor and Public Welfare Committee, the Appropriations Committee, the Judiciary Committee, and as national chairman for all of Reagan's presidential campaigns. Beginning in 1982, when Republicans regained the majority in the Senate he became the chairman of the Judiciary Committee's Regulatory Reform Subcommittee and the general chairman of the Republican Party. In Laxalt's two terms he participated in the first and second sessions of the 94th Congress (1975-1977), the first and second sessions of the 95th Congress (1977-1979), the first and second sessions of the 96th Congress (1979-1981), the first and second sessions of the 97th Congress (1981-1983), the first and second sessions of the 98th Congress (1983-1985), and although his political involvement began to wane in 1986, his career covered the first and second sessions of the 99th Congress (1985-1987). The papers and materials located within this collection reflect these congressional activities and the committee positions held by Laxalt. They also offer insights into the legislative, political, and democratic processes in the United States Senate.

After the successes up to and including Reagan's reelection in 1984, Laxalt again began to tire of politics. He had been in the Senate for ten years and his friend was now a lame duck president. As his second term progressed, Laxalt privately decided it was the appropriate time to make a graceful exit from the Senate. Amidst pressure from friends, colleagues, and staffers and much self-reflection, Laxalt retreated to Marlette Lake, his Sierra Nevada refuge and made his decision to retire effective in January 1987. He offered his support to Jim Santini. Santini ran a hard campaign but lost the race to then-Congressman Harry Reid. Despite Laxalt losing his seat to the Democrats, the Republicans still managed to hold a slight majority in the Senate. Although Laxalt threw around the idea of running for the presidency in 1988, and even formed an exploratory committee, he eventually ditched the effort when he failed to raise his designated campaign funding goal. He did remain politically active helping with the George Bush campaign in 1988 and acting as an advisor for Senator Bob Dole's 1996 presidential bid. Laxalt continued to work in Washington as a political consultant and lobbyist with his business, "The Paul Laxalt Group," but maintained his ties with his home state and his beloved Marlette Lake.

Laxalt's legacy is lasting, from the son of a Basque sheepherder to the best friend of one of America's most beloved and admired presidents. His independent instincts and distinctive political style allowed him to accomplish many of the goals he set for himself. One initiative that Laxalt derived great personal satisfaction from was the intern program that he established during his tenure in the Senate. College-age students were given the opportunity to travel to Washington, D.C. and work in Laxalt's Senate office for the equivalent of one semester. The program was responsible for turning out several individuals who went on to prominent careers in government including Nevada's current Governor, Brian Sandoval. On August 2, 2012, Governor Sandoval declared that the date should be therefore designated as "Paul Laxalt Day."

Further reading on Paul Laxalt can be found in his memoir Nevada's Paul Laxalt: A Memoir (Reno, Nevada: Jack Bacon and Company, 2000), and in Laxalt's The Nominating of a President: The Three Nominations of Ronald Reagan as Republican Candidate for the Presidency (Reno, Nevada: Native Nevadan Publications, 1985).

This project is made possible by a Library Services and Technology Act grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, administered by the Nevada State Library and Archives. With its support, these important materials from our political past are now available.

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Scope and Content

The Paul Laxalt U. S. Senatorial Papers are contained within 850 cubic feet, and are primarily from Laxalt's tenure in the U. S. Senate dating from his entrance in 1974 to his retirement in 1987. Due to the size of this congressional collection, few resources have been available to organize and prepare the materials for users. However, in 2014 Special Collections applied for and received a Library Services and Technology Act grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, administered by the Nevada State Library and Archives to work with just the materials regarding Paul Laxalt's relationship with Ronald Reagan found within Laxalt's tenure in the U. S. Senate. Laxalt served as an advisor, campaign manager, and personal friend to President Ronald Reagan. These materials were organized and cataloged during 2015-2016.

Currently, the Paul Laxalt U. S. Senatorial Papers consist of one group: Ronald Reagan. This group covers the years 1975-1987 and are contained in 34.5 cubic feet housed within 42 boxes. None of the other materials have been reviewed for further organization. Group 1 is only a fraction of what is actually contained within the entire collection.

Group 1: Ronald Reagan, consists of papers, audio/visual resources, scrapbooks, and photographs that are associated with or related to Ronald Reagan and his three presidential campaigns in 1976, 1980, and 1984 and Laxalt's role as his national chairman. Other files include general White House correspondence and requests, constituency correspondence, and to a lesser degree materials relating to contentious policy issues of the Reagan Administration. Also represented are materials from Laxalt's roles as chairman of the Republican Party

Group 1 is divided into six individual series: Series 1) 1976 Presidential Campaign; Series 2) 1980 Presidential Campaign and Reagan Election; Series 3) Reagan Administration First Term, 1980-1984; Series 4) 1984 Reagan Reelection Campaign; Series 5) Reagan Administration Second Term, 1985-1989; and Series 6) Scrapbooks. It should be noted that Series 4 includes two subseries: Subseries 1) Republican National Committee and GOP Planning and Strategy; and Subseries 2: 1984 Campaign. Furthermore, it should be noted that any audio/visual resources have been listed at the end of their respective series with all items physically contained in Box 1008.

Laxalt maintained offices in Carson City, Reno, Las Vegas, and Washington, D.C. Materials retained from each of these offices are represented within this collection. Some of Laxalt's legislative staff included Ed Allison, Tom Loranger, Sam Bellenger, Carol Laxalt, Al Drischler, David Bethel, Bill Adams, and Eileen de Latour, among others.

Restrictions

Restricted use for all materials except those dealing with Ronald Reagan. Materials must be used on-site; advance notice suggested.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Donated by Paul Laxalt in 1983.

Separated Materials

Photographs are placed in the Special Collections Photo Archive as collection number UNRS-P2015-12.

As part of the Library Services and Technology Act grant, a small selection of documents and photographs from Group 1 that highlight aspects of the Laxalt-Reagan relationship were scanned and can be found in our Digital Collections exhibit entitled "'The First Friend' of Ronald Reagan; Senator Paul Laxalt and Presidential Politics" : http://guides.library.unr.edu/laxalt-reagan/.

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Arrangement

Group 1: Ronald Reagan

  • Group 1, Series 1 1976 Presidential Campaign
  • Group 1, Series 2 1980 Presidential Campaign and Reagan Election
  • Group 1, Series 3 Reagan Administration First Term 1980-1984
  • Group 1, Series 4 1984 Reagan Reelection Campaign
  • Group 1, Series 4, Subseries 1 Republican National Committee and GOP Planning and Strategy
  • Group 1, Series 4, Subseries 2 1984 Campaign
  • Group 1, Series 5 Reagan Administration Second Term 1985-1989
  • Group 1, Series 6 Scrapbooks

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Index Terms

This collection is indexed under the following headings in the online catalog of the University Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno. Researchers wishing to find related materials are encouraged to use the following index terms:

Organizations:

People:

Subjects:

Geographic Locations:



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Administrative Information

Collection processed by Edan Strekal and Jacquelyn Sundstrand, September 2015. Finding aid prepared by Edan Strekal and Jacquelyn Sundstrand, September 2015. This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit on July 12, 2016.

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Detailed Description of the Records

Group 1: Ronald Reagan, 1975-1987 34.5 cubic feet

Group 1 consists of materials accumulated by Paul Laxalt and his staff during Laxalt's tenure as a U.S. senator, and Reagan's first attempt as a presidential hopeful and later as the president of the United States. Reagan was raised in a poor family in Northern Illinois. In high school and college he became interested in sports and theater. After graduating from Eureka College, in Eureka Illinois in 1932, he began working as a sports radio announcer on several regional radio stations, but he had larger aspirations of becoming a movie actor. In 1937, while accompanying the Chicago Cubs to Southern California for spring training, Reagan was offered an appointment with a talent agent. He did a screen test with Warner Brothers and then signed a contract as a B-movie player and quickly moved from Iowa to California. After his portrayal of famous Notre Dame Football coach, Knute Rockne, he began landing bigger parts that would eventually ensure him a long and distinguished career as a Hollywood actor. After a brief stint as a businessman with General Electric, Reagan decided in 1966 to run for governor of California as a Republican candidate, the same year Laxalt ran for governor of Nevada. Reagan served as governor for two terms ending in 1974.

By most standards, Reagan was a popular and successful governor, the next logical step it seemed was for him to run for president. Reagan ran a campaign in 1968, but was defeated by Richard Nixon in the primaries. In a largely unpopular political move to unseat President Gerald Ford, Reagan's next run at the White House came in 1976 with Laxalt as his campaign manager. Unfortunately, Reagan lost to Ford in the primaries, and Ford subsequently lost the general election to Democrat Jimmy Carter.

Four years later, Reagan took to the campaign trail again with Laxalt by his side. This time Reagan was elected as the thirty-ninth president of the United States just a little less than six and a half years after Nixon's resignation. Planning for Reagan's reelection began almost immediately after he took office in January 1981. Reagan did indeed run for reelection in 1984 easily defeating Walter Mondale. Laxalt resigned as a senator in 1986 before Reagan's second term ended, however, by that time, the Republican Party had undoubtedly been rebuilt and strengthened after the tumultuous events of the 1970s. This group reflects not only the campaign efforts of the Reagan camp, but also contains materials that represent some of the important policy issues concerning Congress and the constituency base during the Reagan Administration.

Group 1 is divided into six individual series: 1) 1976 Presidential Campaign; 2) 1980 Presidential Campaign and Reagan Election; 3) Reagan Administration First Term 1980-1984; 4) Reagan Reelection Campaign; 5) Reagan Administration Second Term 1985-1989; and 6) Scrapbooks. Any photographs that have been removed from these materials have been separated and placed in the Special Collections Photo Archive collection number UNRS-P2015-12. All audio/visual materials that were located have also been placed with their corresponding series at the end of each series. Series 6 includes copies of scrapbook indexes that were originally created by Laxalt's staff. These give an itemized listing of all of the materials that are contained within each book. In the absence of an index, a description of the scrapbook and its contents has been created.

Group 1, Series 1: 1976 Presidential Campaign, 1975-1976 2.5 cubic feet

Group 1, Series 1 includes information and material on Ronald Reagan's 1976 presidential campaign. The files in this series have been arranged chronologically according to month and year. This series contains quite a bit of constituency correspondence in support of Reagan's decision to run for president, press materials, statements, speeches, committee and organization materials, schedules, and itineraries. The series begins with constituency correspondence arranged alphabetically by the state that it came from. Following the state designations, files are arranged chronologically according to months and years.

In 1975, after two terms as the 33rd governor of California, Ronald Reagan began actively considering the possibility of running for president. The Republican Party was still reeling following Richard Nixon's admitted involvement in the 1972 Watergate scandal and the subsequent pardon offered two years later by President Ford. Reagan asked Laxalt's opinion on the matter, especially what type of support me might expect from Republicans on Capitol Hill. It didn't take long for Laxalt to realize that Reagan was not a favorite among the Washington establishment. At times it seemed that Laxalt might have been his only supporter in Congress. In July 1975, Laxalt announced the formation of the Citizens for Reagan committee. Laxalt expected the committee would convince Reagan to seek the Republican nomination for president.

By November 1975, Reagan announced his candidacy with Laxalt acting as the chairman of the campaign. As the campaign began, it quickly gained more support than political pundits had anticipated. With only a few caucus states remaining, questions surrounding Reagan's choice for vice president began emerging. As a strategic move, John Sears, vice chairman of Citizens for Reagan and campaign manager, suggested he select Pennsylvania Senator Richard Schweiker as his running mate. Schweiker, though designated as a Republican, was viewed by the media and some of his colleagues as a "middle-of-the-road" liberal. Reagan's campaign team believed the addition of Schweiker would balance out the Reagan ticket and potentially sway undecided delegates in their direction.

Regardless of his unpopularity in Washington, Reagan made a dramatic run for the Republican nomination against sitting president and incumbent Gerald Ford. His strategy of directly engaging the voters worked well during the primaries, so well that Reagan fell short by only a few votes at the 1976 Republican National Convention in Kansas City, Missouri. Press speculation following the primaries placed Reagan as the obvious choice for vice president on the Ford ticket. Reagan however, was not interested and word quickly reached the Ford camp. Ford instead picked Bob Dole as his running mate, but in the end lost the general election to Jimmy Carter by a small margin. Though the 1976 campaign resulted in a loss for Reagan, he had proven himself as a charismatic and viable Republican candidate for the future. The events of 1976 laid the groundwork for the 1980 presidential campaign and marked a period of revitalization in the conservative movement in America.

Box
Folder
Contents
208
1
Reagan campaign correspondence from Arizona, 1975-1976
208
2
Reagan campaign correspondence from California, part 1, 1975-1976
208
3
Reagan campaign correspondence from California, part 2, 1975-1976
208
4
Reagan campaign correspondence from Colorado, 1975-1976
208
5
Reagan campaign correspondence from Connecticut, 1975-1976
208
6
Reagan campaign correspondence from Delaware, 1975-1976
208
7
Reagan campaign correspondence from the District of Columbia, 1975-1976
208
8
Reagan campaign correspondence from Hawaii, 1976
208
9
Reagan campaign correspondence from Idaho, 1975-1976
208
10
Reagan campaign correspondence from Illinois, 1975-1976
208
11
Reagan campaign correspondence from Indiana, 1975-1976
208
12
Reagan campaign correspondence from Iowa, 1975-1975
208
13
Reagan campaign correspondence from Kansas, 1975-1976
208
14
Reagan campaign correspondence from Kentucky, 1975-1976
208
15
Reagan campaign correspondence from Louisiana, 1975-1976
208
16
Reagan campaign correspondence from Maine, 1975-1976
208
17
Reagan campaign correspondence from Maryland, 1975-1976
208
18
Reagan campaign correspondence from Massachusetts, 1975-1976
208
19
Reagan campaign correspondence from Michigan, 1975-1976
208
20
Reagan campaign correspondence from Minnesota, 1975-1976
208
21
Reagan campaign correspondence from Mississippi, 1976
208
22
Reagan campaign correspondence from Missouri, 1975-1976
208
23
Reagan campaign correspondence from Montana, 1975-1976
208
24
Reagan campaign correspondence from Nebraska, 1976
208
25
Reagan campaign correspondence from Nevada, part 1, 1975-1976
208
26
Reagan campaign correspondence from Nevada, part 2, 1975-1976
208
27
Reagan campaign correspondence from Nevada, part 3, 1975-1976
208
28
Reagan campaign correspondence from New Hampshire, 1975-1976
208
29
Reagan campaign correspondence from New Jersey, 1975-1976
208
30
Reagan campaign correspondence from New Mexico, 1975-1976
Box
Folder
Contents
369
1
Reagan campaign correspondence from New York, 1975-1976
369
2
Reagan campaign correspondence from North Carolina, 1975-1976
369
3
Reagan campaign correspondence from North Dakota, 1976
369
4
Reagan campaign correspondence from Ohio, 1975-1976
369
5
Reagan campaign correspondence from Oklahoma, 1975-1976
369
6
Reagan campaign correspondence from Oregon, 1975-1976
369
7
Reagan campaign correspondence from Pennsylvania, 1975-1976
369
8
Reagan campaign correspondence from Rhode Island, 1976
369
9
Reagan campaign correspondence from South Carolina, 1976
369
10
Reagan campaign correspondence from South Dakota, 1975-1976
369
11
Reagan campaign correspondence from Tennessee, 1975-1976
369
12
Reagan campaign correspondence from Texas, 1975-1976
369
13
Reagan campaign correspondence from Utah, 1975-1976
369
14
Reagan campaign correspondence from Vermont, 1975-1976
369
15
Reagan campaign correspondence from Virginia, 1975-1976
369
16
Reagan campaign correspondence from Washington, 1976
369
17
Reagan campaign correspondence from West Virginia, 1975-1976
369
18
Reagan campaign correspondence from Wisconsin, 1975-1976
369
19
Reagan press correspondence, 1975-1976
369
20
Personal file for Governor Reagan, 1975-1976
369
21
Reagan radio, column materials, remarks, and statements, 1975-1976
369
22
Travel itinerary and speeches from campaign, 1975-1976
369
23
Reagan campaign committee, July-August 1975
369
24
News clips, July-December 1975
369
25
Laxalt's travel for Reagan campaign, August 1975
369
26
Constituency correspondence to Reagan regarding his stance on common situs picketing, November-December 1975
369
27
Reagan for President bumper stickers and button, 1976
369
28
Citizens for Reagan, 1976
369
29
Laxalt interview on Reagan transcripts, 1976
369
30
News clips, 1976
Box
Folder
Contents
1002
1
General Reagan campaign materials, February-July 1976
1002
2
New releases and media, March-October 1976
1002
3
Materials regarding planning and information on delegates for Republican National Convention in Kansas City, May-August 1976
1002
4
Personal Reagan correspondence, June-September 1976
1002
5
Letters in support of Reagan nomination sent to Laxalt at Republican National Convention in Kansas City, July 1976
1002
6
Bill Adams' (special assistant to Paul Laxalt) Reagan file, July-September 1976
1002
7
Laxalt's nominating speech for Reagan, August 1976
1002
8
Republican National Convention invitation, rules, and information on Kansas City, August 1976
1002
9
Republican National Convention schedule of events, August 1976
1002
10
List of delegates at Republican National Convention, August 1976
1002
11
Republican National Convention platform by Paul Bethel, August 1976
1002
12
Personal correspondence to Laxalt following Reagan's defeat in the primary, September 197
Box
Folder
Contents
1008
1
Laxalt on behalf of Reagan Committee press conference in Boise (cassette tape), November-December 1975
1008
2
GOP National Convention in Kansas City footage (Beta videocassette), 1976

Group 1, Series 2: 1980 Presidential Campaign and Election, 1977-1983 10.5 cubic feet

Group 1, Series 2 includes information and materials relating to Ronald Reagan's 1980 presidential campaign and his ensuing victory. The files in this series have been arranged chronologically according to months and years. Though this series pertains to Reagan's 1980 presidential campaign, the materials date from 1977 to 1983. Anything prior to 1980 is preparatory material for the 1980 presidential and congressional elections. The items at the end of this series that date to the months and years following the 1980 campaign and election relate to the Reagan Administration's transition initiative, finance issues from the campaign, invitations to the inauguration event, and a dinner for those that had been involved in the campaign. All materials in this series are relevant to the overall process and efforts put forth in getting Ronald Reagan elected as the 40th president of the United States. This series consists of the campaign team's campaign files, materials from Citizens for the Republic, Reagan Advisory Committee materials, editorials and correspondence from William Loeb, constituency correspondence, internal correspondence, press materials, news clips, itineraries, reports, materials regarding Reagan and Laxalt's opposition to the transfer of the Panama Canal, and transition team initiatives following Reagan's election.

As early as 1977, Reagan created a political vehicle called Citizens for the Republic headed by Lyn Nofziger. This political action committee (PAC) was designed to advance the conservative cause at a time when it seemed that those ideas were being abandoned in the United States. This PAC gave Reagan the funding to travel around the country to meet with key supporters, advance the conservative messages of self-determination and small government, and support like-minded candidates for various other state and local offices. William Loeb, owner and publisher of the Manchester Union Leader, was also very active during this time pushing conservative editorials in his New Hampshire based newspaper. Loeb was known for vitriolic editorials expounding the dangers of liberalism, collectivism, and Communism while at the same time preaching the virtues of conservatism and especially Ronald Reagan. Loeb kept in regular contact with Laxalt in the late 1970s, sending him correspondence and editorials on the conservative issues. These exchanges are present in this series beginning in 1977. Also present are several files containing material on the formation of Laxalt and Reagan's Committee to Save the Canal (which soon became known as the Panama Truth Squad), a response to President Carter's proposed treaties to turn over the canal to the Panamanian government. These initiatives and events served as unifying factors for the Republican Party that marked the early stages of Reagan's 1980 presidential campaign.

By March 1979, the Reagan exploratory committee was formed, and in November of the same year, the campaign kicked off in New York with Laxalt again acting as the chairman and John Sears as the campaign manager (though he was distrusted by conservatives, Bill Casey would take his place). Early in 1980 the Republican field was crowded with other presidential hopefuls including George H. Bush, Senators Bob Dole, Howard Baker, Phil Crane, and Texas Governor John Connally. Bush proved to be Reagan's strongest competitor from the onset, but quickly lost momentum and withdrew by May of that year. He would eventually become Reagan's running mate, but prior to the announcement there was much speculation that Laxalt or even Gerald Ford might make it on the ticket as the vice presidential candidate.

Reagan emerged as the dominant figure in the 1980 presidential campaign. He was able to muster support from both Republicans and the diverse elements that constituted the New Right. Reagan vowed to reenergize and revitalize America to make it "number one again." After four years of the Carter Administration, many Americans felt demoralized by high inflation, joblessness, and the poor handling of foreign affairs. Reagan's campaign team often referred to the "misery index" as a way of visibly measuring the failures of the Carter Administration. The results were disastrous for Carter. On Election Day in November 1980, Reagan easily defeated Carter by a landslide when he received 51 percent of the popular vote to Carter's 41%. Not only had Reagan won the presidency, but the Republicans had also taken control of the U.S. Senate for the first time since 1954. It was a momentous win for Reagan, Laxalt (who won reelection to the Senate), and the rest of the campaign team and supporters.

Box
Folder
Contents
1002
13
Correspondence and news clips from William Loeb (president of Manchester Union Leader newspaper) regarding issues leading up to 1980 Republican primary, 1977-1978
1002
14
Truth Squad mailing and correspondence, 1977-1979
1002
15
Citizens for the Republic file, March-August 1977
1002
16
Citizens for the Republic Salt Lake City seminar, May-June 1977
1002
17
Reagan's statements regarding the Panama Canal, August 1977
1002
18
Citizens for the Republic Chicago meeting, September-November 1977
1002
19
Citizens for the Republic file, September-December 1977
1002
20
Reagan, Ford, and Laxalt California speech, October 1977
1002
21
News clips and press materials, 1978-1979
1002
22
Citizens for the Republic file, January-March 1978
Box
Folder
Contents
380
1
Citizens for the Republic file, April-July 1978
380
2
Citizens for the Republic file, August-September 1978
380
3
Citizens for the Republic file, October-November 1978
380
4
Citizens for the Republic file, December 1978
380
5
Citizens for the Republic file, 1979
380
6
Travel Itinerary, 1979
380
7
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, January 1979
380
8
General Reagan file, January-March 1979
380
9
Correspondence and news clips from William Loeb regarding issues leading up to 1980 Republican primary, January-March 1979
380
10
Richard Richards' (Regional Political Director of Reagan campaign) memos, January-March 1979
380
11
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, February 1976
380
12
Reagan announcement file, February-March 1979
380
13
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, March 1979
380
14
Reagan campaign file, March 1979
380
15
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, March-May 1979
Box
Folder
Contents
1003
1
Correspondence and news clips from William Loeb regarding issues leading up to the 1980 Republican primary (contains two photographs), March-July 1979
1003
2
Candidate security for the Reagan campaign, March-October 1979
1003
3
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, April 1979
1003
4
Reagan campaign file, April 1979
1003
5
Reagan campaign file, May 1979
1003
6
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, May 1979
1003
7
Reagan D.C. headquarters materials, May-November 1979
1003
8
Reagan campaign file, June 1979
1003
9
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, June-July 1979
1003
10
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, June-July 1979
1003
11
Reagan campaign file, July 1979
1003
12
Reagan campaign file, August-September 1979
1003
13
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, August-September 1979
1003
14
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, August-September 1979
1003
15
Memoranda from Richard Williamson (assistant to Reagan for intergovernmental affairs), August-September 1979
1003
16
Correspondence and news clips from William Loeb (president of Manchester Union Leader newspaper) regarding issues leading up to the 1980 Republican primary, August-October 1979
1003
17
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, October 1979
Box
Folder
Contents
372
1
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, October 1979
372
2
Reagan campaign file, October 1979
372
3
Reagan campaign briefing papers (removed from binder), October-November 1979
372
4
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, November 1979
372
5
Reagan campaign file, November 1979
372
6
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, November 1979
372
7
Reagan for President Regional Political Directors and state committees and offices, November 1979
372
8
Reagan position papers (removed from binder), November 1979
372
9
Reagan policy papers (removed from binder), November 1979
372
10
Reagan campaign file, December 1979
372
11
Reagan for President Advisory Committee, December 1979
372
12
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, December 1979-January 1980
372
13
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan campaign issues, December 1979-April 1980
372
14
News clips and press materials, part 1, 1980
372
15
News clips and press materials, part 2, 1980
372
16
Constituency correspondence regarding SALT and MX missile issues, 1980
Box
Folder
Contents
1004
1
Reagan transition team management requirements, 1980-1981
1004
2
Reagan Issues Summary booklet (removed from binder), January 1980
1004
3
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, January 1980
1004
4
Reagan campaign file, January-February 1980
1004
5
Constituency correspondence expressing concerns with the Carter Administration, January-June 1980
1004
6
Constituency correspondence regarding George Bush and the Trilateral Commission, January-July 1980
1004
7
Reagan for President Advisory Committee, February 1980
1004
8
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, February 1980
1004
9
Reagan campaign file, March 1980
1004
10
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, March 1980
1004
11
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, March-April 1980
1004
12
Constituency correspondence regarding economic concerns and issues coming into the 1980 presidential election, March-August 1980
1004
13
Reagan campaign file, part 1, April 1980
1004
14
Reagan campaign file, part 2, April 1980
1004
15
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 1, April 1980
1004
16
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 2, April 1980
Box
Folder
Contents
373
1
Constituency correspondence regarding vice presidential candidates, April-May 1980
373
2
Reagan issue summary materials, April-June 1980
373
3
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan's stance on foreign policy issues, April-August 1980
373
4
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan's views on the Helms Amendment and family planning issues, April-November 1980
373
5
Invitations forwarded to Ronald Reagan, April-November 1980
373
6
Reagan campaign file, part 1, May 1980
373
7
Reagan campaign file, part 2, May 1980
373
8
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, part 1, May 1980
373
9
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, part 2, May 1980
373
10
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 1, May 1980
373
11
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 2, May 1980
373
12
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan campaign issues, May-October 1980
373
13
Reagan campaign file, part 1, June 1980
Box
Folder
Contents
374
1
Reagan campaign file, part 2, June 1980
374
2
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, part 1, June 1980
374
3
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, part 2, June 1980
374
4
Correspondence regarding the Reagan presidential campaign, part 1, June 1980
374
5
Correspondence regarding the Reagan presidential campaign, part 2, June 1980
374
6
Correspondence regarding the Reagan presidential campaign, part 3, June 1980
374
7
Correspondence regarding the Reagan presidential campaign, part 4, June 1980
374
8
George Bush Vice President file, June 1980
374
9
Constituency correspondence regarding vice presidential candidates, part 1, June-July 1980
374
10
Constituency correspondence regarding vice presidential candidates, part 2, June-July 1980
374
11
Constituency correspondence about Reagan's response to the Equal Rights Amendment, June-September 1980
374
12
Reagan campaign file, July 1980
374
13
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 1, July 1980
Box
Folder
Contents
429
1
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 2, July 1980
429
2
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 3, July 1980
429
3
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 4, July 1980
429
4
Reagan for President Advisory Committee materials, July-August 1980
429
5
Constituency correspondence expressing concerns with the Carter Administration, July-October 1980
429
6
Reagan campaign file, part 1, August 1980
429
7
Reagan campaign file, part 2, August 1980
429
8
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 1, August 1980
429
9
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 2, August 1980
429
10
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 3, August 1980
429
11
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 4, August 1980
429
12
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 5, August 1980
Box
Folder
Contents
250
1
Reagan and Bush campaign administrative materials, August-October 1980
250
2
Constituency correspondence regarding George Bush and the Trilateral Commission, August-November 1980
250
3
Reagan campaign file, part 1, September 1980
250
4
Reagan campaign file, part 2, September 1980
250
5
Reagan campaign file, part 3, September 1980
250
6
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 1, September 1980
250
7
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 2, September 1980
250
8
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 3, September 1980
250
9
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 4, September 1980
250
10
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 5, September 1980
250
11
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 6, September 1980
250
12
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 7, September 1980
Box
Folder
Contents
1005
1
Reagan and Bush on the Issues (removed from binder), September 1980
1005
2
The Capitol Steps event briefing materials (removed from binder), September 1980
1005
3
Pre-Inaugural planning (removed from binder), September-October 1980
1005
4
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan's stance on foreign policy issues, September-November 1980
1005
5
Constituency correspondence regarding economic concerns and issues coming into the 1980 presidential election, September-November 1980
1005
6
Reagan campaign file, part 1, October 1980
1005
7
Reagan campaign file, part 2, October 1980
1005
8
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 1, October 1980
1005
9
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 2, October 1980
1005
10
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 3, October 1980
1005
11
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, part 4, October 1980
1005
12
Summary and activities of voter groups during the Reagan campaign (removed from binder), part 1, October 1980
1005
13
Summary and activities of voter groups during the Reagan campaign (removed from binder), part 2, October 1980
1005
14
Summary and activities of voter groups during the Reagan campaign (removed from binder), part 3, October 1980
Box
Folder
Contents
376
1
Reagan administration transition file, October-November 1980
376
2
Constituency correspondence regarding Reagan, November 1980
376
3
Reagan inaugural committee file, November 1980
376
4
Correspondence, media, schedules, and related materials following Reagan's election, November 1980
376
5
Correspondence regarding the election of Reagan, November-December 1980
376
6
Administration transition correspondence, November-December 1980
376
7
Correspondence and related materials following Reagan's election, December 1980
376
8
Briefing Manual, part 1, December 1980
376
9
Briefing Manual, part 2, December 1980
376
10
Proposed changes to presidential election process, January 1981
376
11
Invitations to the Presidential Inauguration events, January 1981
376
12
Federal Election Commission Reagan-Bush campaign audit, February 1981
376
13
The New Yorker article on Reagan campaign, March 1981
376
14
Reagan-Bush Compliance Fund, September 1981-February 1982
376
15
Reagan-Bush Reunion Dinner in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, May-June 1983
Box
Folder
Contents
1003
18
Reagan with U.S. Senators lunch (microcassette), January 22, 1979
1003
19
Reagan with U.S. Senators dinner (microcassette), January 23, 1979
1003
20
Laxalt intro of Reagan and Reagan remarks at CPAC at Hyatt Regency hotel on Capitol Hill (cassette tape), February 5, 1977
1003
21
Laxalt on Reagan Campaign (cassette tape), February 1979
1003
22
Reagan press conference (cassette tape), November 14, 1979
1003
23
Darn Tootin' We Need the Panama Canal song (cassette tape), April 1980
1003
24
Nevada GOP Convention, 7/13-Face the Nation, 7/16 Reagan Nomination Speech (cassette tape), April-July 1980
1003
25
Panama Canal Testimony of Ronald Reagan (reel-to-reel recording), part 1, 1977
1003
26
Panama Canal Testimony of Ronald Reagan (reel-to-reel recording), part 2, 1977
1003
27
Panama Canal Testimony of Ronald Reagan (reel-to-reel recording), part 3, 1977
1003
28
Panama Canal Testimony of Ronald Reagan (16-millimeter color reel), 1977
1003
29
Face the Nation segment on Reagan campaign (VHS tape), 1980

Group 1, Series 3: Reagan Administration First Term, 1980-1984 2.25 cubic feet

Group 1, Series 3 includes information and materials from President Reagan's first term in office. The files in this series have been arranged chronologically according to months and years. This series is comprised of materials that are related to Laxalt's political relationship with President Reagan, but not related to the presidential campaigns.

A good deal of the files are dedicated to correspondence and requests sent to the White House that were answered by Laxalt on behalf of the president. Also included is a large amount of constituency correspondence regarding issues surrounding the Reagan presidency including the national debt, the MX missile system, propaganda in Western Europe, the Iran hostage crisis, education, energy, and others. In addition, this series includes speeches, statements, magazine articles, press files, some news clips, and reports on political issues. It is worth noting that there is some information from the days immediately following the assassination attempt on President Reagan on March 30, 1981 just 69 days into his first term. Reagan's agenda was focused heavily in three areas: cutting taxes, balancing the budget, and beefing up national defense (in the midst of the Cold War). These issues are reflected in the materials in this series.

It was during Reagan's first term as president that Laxalt became known by the media as "the best friend of the president," or "the First Friend." Many of the magazine articles and news clips in this series are about Laxalt and Reagan's relationship. Laxalt was said to have one foot in Congress, and one in the White House. It was also during this term that Laxalt became the general chairman of the Republican Party, a position that would last from January 1983 through January 1987. More information on Laxalt's role as the general chairman of the Republican Party can be found in Series 4, Subseries 1: Republican National Committee and GOP Planning and Strategy, which focuses on the efforts of the Republicans to maintain power in the Senate and their planning for Reagan's reelection in 1984.

Box
Folder
Contents
376
16
Correspondence and cassette tapes from George Sumner to Reagan and Laxalt regarding International money and debt issues, December 1980-January 1981
376
17
Press, Speeches, and interviews, 1981
376
18
Reagan administration appointment file, 1981
Box
Folder
Contents
367
1
News clips, 1981
367
2
Reagangate, 1981-1982
367
3
Laxalt's statements and addresses to President Reagan, 1981-1982
367
4
General presidential correspondence from Reagan to Laxalt, 1981-1982
367
5
Constituency correspondence regarding the Reagan administration, January-February 1981
367
6
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, January-February 1981
367
7
Monthly Column press releases by Paul Laxalt, January-February 1981
367
8
Recommendations for appointments in the Reagan administration, January-April 1981
367
9
Constituency correspondence regarding the Iran hostage crisis, January-April 1981
367
10
Constituency correspondence regarding energy issues, January-September 1981
367
11
Le Figaro magazine interview with Reagan, February 1981
367
12
Citizens for the Republic newsletter volume 5, number 2, February 1981
367
13
The Heritage Foundation Backgrounder newsletter regarding Reagan economic program, February 1981
367
14
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, March-April 1981
367
15
Constituency correspondence regarding the Reagan administration, March-September 1981
367
16
Materials from the events following the assassination attempt on Reagan, April 1981
367
17
Nevadans for the Advancement of Reagan general file, May 1981
367
18
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, May-June 1981
367
19
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, July-August 1981
367
20
Address by the President to the Nation, September 1981
367
21
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, September-October 1981
367
22
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, September-October 1981
367
23
Reagan's speech, November 19, 1981
367
24
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, November-December 1981
367
25
General White House correspondence, 1982
367
26
The New York Times article regarding Laxalt and Reagan's political relationship, 1982
367
27
White House correspondence regarding presidential appearances, 1982-1983
Box
Folder
Contents
364
1
State of the Union address by President Reagan, January 1982
364
2
CPAC (American Conservative Union) Conference and Banquet, January-February 1982
364
3
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, January-April 1982
364
4
Journalist Kristina Bonilla file on propaganda battle in Western Europe, January-May 1982
364
5
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, May-December 1982
364
6
White House Correspondence to Laxalt regarding the MX missile system, November 1982
364
7
Patterson Strategy Letter, volume 3000, issue 85, November 1982
364
8
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, 1983
364
9
White House Press Office Materials, January-March 1983
364
10
White House correspondence regarding presidential appearances, January-August 1983
364
11
General White House correspondence, April-December 1983
364
12
Education issues of the Reagan administration, June-September 1983
364
13
White House correspondence regarding presidential appearances, September-December 1983
364
14
Draft outline on U.S. Debt situation, 1984
364
15
Public Employee newsletter, volume 49, number 1, January 1984
364
16
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, January-February 1984
364
17
White House correspondence regarding presidential appearances, January-February 1984
364
18
Bipartisan deficit commission meetings (removed from binder), February-March 1984
364
19
White House correspondence regarding presidential appearances, March-July 1984
364
20
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, March-September 1984
364
21
Administration Crime Legislation (removed from binder), May 1984
364
22
White House correspondence regarding presidential appearances, August 1984
Box
Folder
Contents
384
1
White House correspondence regarding presidential appearances, September-December 1984
384
2
White House correspondence regarding the President answered by Laxalt, October-December 1984
Box
Folder
Contents
1008
1
Cassette tape from George Sumner regarding international money and debt, January 15, 1981
1008
2
Cassette tape from George Sumner regarding international money and debt, January 16, 1981
1008
3
Cassette tape from George Sumner regarding international money and debt, January 20, 1981
1008
4
President's shooting (VHS tape), March 30, 1981
1008
5
Laxalt with the president in the Oval Office on MX missile system (VHS tape), Fall 1981

Group 1, Series 4: 1984 Reagan Reelection Campaign, 1981-1984 8.0 cubic feet

Group 1, Series 4 consists of two subseries: Series 4, Subseries 1) Republican National Committee and GOP Planning and Strategy; and Series 4, Subseries 2) 1984 Campaign. These subseries contain information and materials on the planning and strategy of the Republican Party prior to the 1984 presidential elections, and materials from President Reagan's 1984 reelection campaign. After winning both the White House and the majority in Senate in 1980, the Republican Party and its supporters were determined to hold on to their newly acquired prize. This involved making the Republican Party more appealing to minority voting groups, receiving favorable numbers in the midterm elections, and maintaining a conservative presence in the White House (preferably President Reagan). Each subseries has been arranged chronologically according to months and years.

Group 1, Series 4, Subseries 1: Republican National Committee and GOP Planning and Strategy, 1981-1984 4.5 cubic feet

Group 1, Series 4, Subseries 1 consists of information and materials that were gathered by Laxalt and his staff leading up to the 1984 presidential elections. This series begins with Republican National Committee (RNC) files organized alphabetically by state. Following the individual state files, all others have been arranged chronologically according to months and years.

Quite a bit of the information in this series is related to the activities of the Republican National Committee (RNC) for which Laxalt became the general chairman beginning in 1983 (same as the Republican Party). The RNC wanted to ensure continued strength and longevity in the Republican Party after the election of Reagan in 1980. During Reagan's first term in office, the RNC worked hard at consolidating delegates, fundraising for the party and its candidates, strengthening a diverse constituency base, and anticipating how various administration might affect Reagan's reelection prospects. These efforts are all highly visible within this series. Included in this series are correspondence, information packets, memoranda, brochures, some news clips, reelection stratagem, media materials, and files on various interest and minority groups.

In the 1982 midterm elections, Republicans were able to maintain a majority in the Senate losing only one seat, but the Democrats cemented their majority in the House of Representatives when they gained 27 seats. The gains made by the Democrats were largely a result of President Reagan's unpopularity, which was brought on by a deepening recession. Voters blamed the downturn on Reagan's economic policies, but despite some national dissension, those close to Reagan, like Laxalt, believed that the prospects for reelection were bright—much brighter than they had been in 1980.

By 1984, the economy had rebounded and Reagan's popularity experienced a resurgence—making him one of the most popular presidents in modern American history. As the 1984 election cycle began, Laxalt was at the height of his political career. He was the general chairman for the Republican Party, chairman of the powerful Appropriations Subcommittee with jurisdiction over the Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, and he served as a conduit between his colleagues in the Senate and the president. Reagan asked Laxalt one more time to be the national chairman for his reelection campaign. Laxalt agreed knowing that it would be much easier than it had been in 1976 or 1980.

Box
Folder
Contents
384
3
Republican National Committee activity in Alabama, 1983-1984
384
4
Republican National Committee activity in Arizona, 1983-1984
384
5
Republican National Committee activity in California, 1982-1984
384
6
Republican National Committee activity in Connecticut, 1983-1984
384
7
Republican National Committee activity in Florida, 1983-1984
384
8
Republican National Committee activity in Georgia, 1983-1984
384
9
Republican National Committee activity in Illinois, 1982-1984
384
10
Republican National Committee activity in Indiana, 1983-1984
384
11
Republican National Committee activity in Iowa, 1983-1984
384
12
Republican National Committee activity in Kansas, 1984
384
13
Republican National Committee activity in Kentucky, 1984
384
14
Republican National Committee activity in Maine, 1983
384
15
Republican National Committee activity in Maryland, 1983
384
16
Republican National Committee activity in Massachusetts, 1983-1984
384
17
Republican National Committee activity in Michigan, 1983-1984
384
18
Republican National Committee activity in Minnesota, 1983-1984
384
19
Republican National Committee activity in Mississippi, 1984
384
20
Republican National Committee activity in Missouri, 1984
384
21
Republican National Committee activity in Montana, 1984
384
22
Republican National Committee activity in Nebraska, 1983-1984
384
23
Republican National Committee activity in Nevada, 1983-1984
384
24
Republican National Committee activity in New Hampshire, 1983-1984
384
25
Republican National Committee activity in New Jersey, 1983
384
26
Republican National Committee activity in New York, 1983-1986
384
27
Republican National Committee activity in North Carolina, 1984
384
28
Republican National Committee activity in North Dakota, 1984
384
29
Republican National Committee activity in Ohio, 1983-1984
384
30
Republican National Committee activity in Oklahoma, 1984
384
31
Republican National Committee activity in Pennsylvania, 1983-1984
384
32
Republican National Committee activity in Puerto Rico, 1983-1984
384
33
Republican National Committee activity in Rhode Island, 1983
384
34
Republican National Committee activity in South Dakota, 1983
384
35
Republican National Committee activity in Texas, 1983-1984
384
36
Republican National Committee activity in Utah, 1983
384
37
Republican National Committee activity in Vermont, 1983
384
38
Republican National Committee activity in Virginia, 1984
384
39
Republican National Committee activity in Washington, 1983-1984
384
40
Republican Party general fundraising file, 1981-1982
384
41
Fundraising for Citizens for the Republic, 1981-1982
384
42
Republican National Committee general correspondence, 1982-1983
384
43
Republican National Committee finance committee, 1982-1983
384
44
Congratulations to Laxalt regarding his position as chairman of the Republican National Committee, part 1, 1982-1983
Box
Folder
Contents
1006
1
Congratulations to Laxalt regarding his position as chairman of the Republican National Committee, part 2, 1982-1983
1006
2
GOP VIP correspondence, 1982-1983
1006
3
Fund for a conservative majority, 1982-1983
1006
4
Republican National Committee issues concerning women's roles in the Republican Party, 1982-1984
1006
5
Republicans Abroad materials, 1982-1984
1006
6
Republican National Committee administrative materials, 1982-1984
1006
7
Republican National Committee labor file, 1982-1984
1006
8
Republican National Committee black vote, 1982-1984
1006
9
Republican National Committee ethnic effort (heritage groups), 1982-1984
1006
10
Republican National Committee Hispanic file, 1982-1984
1006
11
Republican National Committee Asian vote, 1982-1984
1006
12
Republican National Committee Jewish effort, 1982-1984
1006
13
Roger Allan Moore correspondence, 1982-1984
1006
14
Laxalt Republican National Committee materials, 1982-1984
1006
15
GOP Victory Fund, February-August 1982
1006
16
Republican Presidential Task Force, March-September 1982
1006
17
Fundraising for Orrin Hatch, March-December 1982
1006
18
Status of the Republican Party, October 1982
1006
19
GOP members files, November 1982
1006
20
Republican National Committee budget, November 1982
Box
Folder
Contents
251
1
Republican congressional election results, November 1982
251
2
GOP correspondence, November-December 1982
251
3
Equal Rights Amendment report (removed from binder), 1983
251
4
Political Action Committees file, 1983
251
5
Republican National Committee Federal Election Commission file, 1983
251
6
Republican National Committee fundraising, 1983-1984
251
7
Contributions to the Republican National Committee, 1983-1984
251
8
Memoranda from the Republican National Committee to Laxalt, 1983-1984
251
9
Republican Governor Association, 1983-1984
251
10
Republican Senatorial Committee, part 1, 1983-1984
251
11
Republican Senatorial Committee, part 2, 1983-1984
251
12
Federal Election Campaign Act drafts by Republican National Committee, 1983-1984
251
13
Republican National Committee media file, 1983-1984
251
14
Republican National Committee small business advisory council, 1983-1984
251
15
Letters to the Republican National Committee from Laxalt, 1983-1984
251
16
Frank Fahrenkopf correspondence and memoranda, 1983-1984
251
17
Reelection issues, 1983-1984
251
18
GOP correspondence, January-March 1983
251
19
Republican National Committee follow up file, February-June 1983
251
20
Republican National Committee grassroots efforts, March-May 1983
251
21
Michigan Citizens Supporting the President, March-November 1983
251
22
Republican Eagles brochure, April 1983
251
23
GOP correspondence, April-June 1983
251
24
Laxalt's Republican National Committee notes, April-December 1983
251
25
Federal Election Campaign Act hearings, May 1983
251
26
Bob Wood correspondence and memoranda, May-July 1983
251
27
GOP correspondence, July-September 1983
251
28
Regional political meetings and mailings, July-November 1983
251
29
Gender gap within the Republican Party, July-December 1983
251
30
Republican National Committee requests, August-December 1983
251
31
Young Republican National Federation, September 1983
Box
Folder
Contents
654
1
GOP correspondence, October-December 1983
654
2
Laxalt role for Republican National Committee, 1984
654
3
Republican National Committee polling information, 1984
654
4
Ollie Kinney correspondence and memoranda, 1984
654
5
GOP correspondence, January-February 1984
654
6
Puerto Rico, January-March 1984
654
7
Reelection Hispanic campaign, January-April 1984
654
8
Betty Murphy strategist for reelection, January-April 1984
654
9
Democratic candidate Lyndon Larouche, February-March 1984
654
10
Senate races, February-March 1984
654
11
Hispanic support of the Republican Party, February-May 1984
654
12
GOP correspondence, March-April 1984
654
13
Reelect staff, April 1984
654
14
Reagan-Bush reelection FEMA materials, May-July 1984
654
15
Reagan-Bush reelection Housing and Urban Development materials, May-August 1984
654
16
Christian voter registration, June-July 1984
654
17
Direct Selling Association, September 1984
654
18
National Republican Congressional Committee, September-October 1984

Group 1, Series 4, Subseries 2: 1984 Reelection Campaign, 1982-1985 4.5 cubic feet

Group 1, Series 4, Subseries 2 contains information and material relating to President Reagan's 1984 campaign for reelection. The files in this series have been arranged chronologically according to months and years. This series begins with early planning materials for the 1984 Republican National Convention, held that year in Dallas, Texas. Other materials in this series include proposed campaign themes, Republican platform drafts, volunteer information, meeting agendas, itineraries, correspondence, finance reports, polling and research reports, some news clips, briefing books for debates with Walter Mondale, and general campaign files.

The 1984 campaign had some hiccups in the beginning when Reagan told Laxalt and Ed Meese that he wanted to expand the political base by replacing some of the old Reagan supporters with new ones. The two most difficult states proved to be Texas and Illinois, where the Reagan camp suggested new chairmen. These issues are represented in this series and can also be found in the individual state files located in Series 4, Subseries 1: Republican National Committee and GOP Planning and Strategy. Others issues on the campaign trail included a "disastrous" debate with Democratic candidate, Walter Mondale in Louisville, Kentucky in October 1984. Reagan did poorly in comparison to Mondale. The campaign team worried that Reagan had come off stiff, humorless, and most damaging of all, old. The following debate in Kansas City was less structured and Reagan again flourished, laying to rest any doubt about this age.

Laxalt and Reagan traveled around the country campaigning aboard Air Force One. Many of Reagan's campaign appearances that year were to college campuses, which was surprising given the political backlash that occurred on many campuses during the 1960s. Instead, Reagan was greeted with large energetic rallies that no doubt contributed to the overall success of the campaign. As a close to the campaign, they even visited Mondale's home state of Minnesota to campaign against him. Reagan received a surprisingly warm reception from the surrounding farming communities. In November 1984, President Reagan was overwhelmingly reelected receiving 58 percent of the popular vote to Mondale's 40 percent. He won the electoral votes in all the states except for Minnesota and the District of Columbia.

Box
Folder
Contents
654
19
Republican National Convention planning, 1982-1983
654
20
Reaganauts, 1982-1983
654
21
Campaign themes, 1983
654
22
White House campaign meeting file, 1983-1984
654
23
Republican National Convention platform materials, 1983-1984
654
24
Reelection announcements, 1983-1984
654
25
Reelection contributions, 1983-1984
654
26
Reagan reelection "swat team", 1983-1984
654
27
Business groups for Reagan, 1983-1984
654
28
Ethnic voters in reelection campaign, 1983-1984
654
29
Volunteers for the Reagan re-election campaign, 1983-1984
654
30
Campaign media ideas, 1983-1984
654
31
Campaign meetings, 1983-1984
654
32
Independent campaign organizations, 1983-1984
654
33
Bay Buchanan (Treasurer of Campaign Committee) campaign financial policies and expenses, 1983-1984
654
34
White House correspondence regarding campaign organization, 1983-1984
654
35
Texas Chairmanship, 1983-1984
Box
Folder
Contents
666
1
Campaign voter registration, 1983-1984
666
2
State organization for re-election campaign, 1983-1984
666
3
Republican platform hearings in Washington, D.C., 1983-1984
666
4
Campaign finance reports, 1983-1984
666
5
Campaign finance, 1983-1984
666
6
Contributions for Reagan reelection campaign, 1983-1984
666
7
Reelection funding and fundraising, 1983-1984
666
8
Laxalt's handwritten campaign notes, 1983-1984
666
9
Presidential reelection considerations, January-May 1983
666
10
Memoranda regarding polling results for Reagan campaign, February 1983
666
11
Campaign grassroots effort, February-August 1983
666
12
Memoranda regarding polling results for Reagan campaign, March 1983
666
13
Campaign organization, March-June 1984
666
14
Report: The President's Authorized Campaign Committee: A Study of National Attitudes, March 17-21, 1983
666
15
Republican National Committee media usage to support Reagan's bipartisan social security solution, April 1983
666
16
Campaign and State Meetings, April 1983
666
17
Memoranda regarding polling results for Reagan campaign, May 1983
666
18
Report: Republican National Committee: Observation of the 1983 British General Election, June 1983
666
19
Campaign opposition research, June 1983
666
20
Campaign computer security services, June 1983
666
21
Youth visibility project, July 1983
Box
Folder
Contents
377
1
1980 Reagan campaign operating costs, July 1983
377
2
1984 Campaign Briefing Book, July 1983
377
3
Memoranda regarding polling results for Reagan campaign, July-September 1983
377
4
Don Totten Campaign for campaign manager, July-October 1983
377
5
Campaign direct mail resources, July-December 1983
377
6
Report: The President's Authorized Campaign Committee: Flash Results, August 17-22, 1983
377
7
Report: The President's Authorized Campaign Committee: Flash Results, September 6-9, 1983
377
8
Campaign timetable of events, September-November 1983
377
9
Reagan campaign file, September-December 1983
377
10
Kitchen cabinet members, October 1983
377
11
Report: The President's Authorized Campaign Committee: Public Attitudes and Candidate Statements on Federal Debt Deficit (removed from binder), October 1983
377
12
Highlights of the Reagan Administration: A Briefing Book (removed from binder), October 1983
377
13
Proposed State Chairmen for the Reagan campaign (removed from binder), October-November 1983
377
14
Memos from Laxalt to reelect, October-November 1983
377
15
State and County elections, November 1983
377
16
Reagan-Bush ambassador forum, November-December 1983
377
17
Reagan's reelection news clips, 1984
377
18
Republican National Committee: Vice President Malaise: Twenty Years of Mondale, 1984
377
19
Background material on Gary Hart (removed from binder), 1984
377
20
1984 campaign statistics and strategy, 1984
377
21
Next steps in the Reagan revolution, 1984
377
22
Reagan elections news clips, 1984-1985
377
23
Laxalt's announcement schedules for campaign, January 1984
377
24
Delegate selection, January 1984
Box
Folder
Contents
381
1
Memoranda regarding polling results for Reagan campaign, January-February 1984
381
2
Presidential Luncheon correspondence and planning, January-February 1984
381
3
Republican National Convention planning, January-April 1984
381
4
Reagan campaign file, January-May 1984
381
5
Functions for Reagan, January-May 1984
381
6
Surrogate program for Reagan campaign, January-August 1984
381
7
What Other Democrats Are Saying About Walter Mondale, February 1984
381
8
Athletes for Reagan headed by Dick Schafrath, February 1984
381
9
Campaign cabinet meeting agenda, February 1984
381
10
Reagan campaign congressional steering committee, February 1984
381
11
Campaign committee memoranda regarding analysis and survey results, February-May 1984
381
12
Campaign Event Operations briefing book (removed from binder), March 1984
381
13
Sleaze issue as it relates to Reagan campaign, April 1984
381
14
A Proposal for an Extensive Republican Organizational Effort in 1984 (removed from binder), April 1984
381
15
Media Verification Package (removed from binder), part 1, May 1984
381
16
Media Verification Package (removed from binder), part 2, May 1984
381
17
Travel with the President to Colorado Springs, May 1984
381
18
Reagan-Bush Campaign Action Plan II draft, Copy A, May 7, 1984
381
19
Reagan-Bush Campaign Action Plan II, May 19, 1984
381
20
Fundraising and media proposals for Reagan campaign (removed from binder), May-June 1984
381
21
The 1984 Republican Platform draft, May-June 1984
381
22
Republican National Convention planning, May-August 1984
381
23
Reagan campaign file, June-July 1984
Box
Folder
Contents
378
1
Presidential debate file, June-October 1984
378
2
Drafts of issue briefs for Republican National Convention in Dallas, July 1984
378
3
Presidential Trust contribution, July-September 1984
378
4
Walter Mondale file, July-October 1984
378
5
Democrats for Reagan national steering committee, July-October 1984
378
6
Proposed presidential candidate forum on religion, August 1984
378
7
Republican National Convention (contains audio cassette), August-September 1984
378
8
Reagan campaign file, August-November 1984
378
9
Memoranda regarding polling results for Reagan campaign, September 1984
378
10
Republican National Committee Opposition Research Group briefing materials (removed from binder), September 1984
378
11
Report: The President's Authorized Campaign Committee: Flash Results National Tracking, September 12-18, 1984
378
12
Travel with the President to Louisville, Kentucky, September-October 1984
378
13
Briefing book on foreign policy and national security (removed from binder), October 1984
378
14
1984 Presidential Debates briefing materials (removed from binder), October 1984
378
15
Materials relating to Reagan's foreign policy debate with Mondale in Kansas City, October 1984
378
16
Travel with the president to Kansas City for debate, October 1984
378
17
Trip with the President to debate and swing states, October 1984
378
18
Presidential travel to Pennsylvania and Virginia, October 1984
378
19
Election night materials, October-November 1984
378
20
Memoranda regarding polling results for Reagan campaign, October-November 1984
378
21
Travel with the President, November 1984
378
22
Congratulatory correspondence to Laxalt following the campaign, November 1984
378
23
Campaign Directory 1980-1984, December 1984
378
24
Fun facts about the 1984 campaign, March 1985
378
25
Reagan-Bush Anniversary Directory, December 1985
Box
Folder
Contents
1008
7
America, I Love You So, by Jan Chamberlain Rooney (45 record), July 1984
1008
8
Laxalt nomination speech for Reagan and Republican National Convention in Dallas (cassette tape), August 1984
1008
9
1984 Republican National Convention Laxalt nominating speech, Reagan bio and Nancy Reagan bio (Beta videocassette), 1984
1008
10
Reagan-Bush '84 TV spots (Beta videocassette), May 17, 1984
1008
11
Ron Powers on Reagan-Bush '84 TV spots CBS Morning News (Beta videocassette), May 27-29, 1984
1008
12
The Tuesday Team Reagan-Bush '84 TV spots (Beta videocassette), September 18, 1984
1008
13
The Tuesday Team Reagan-Bush '84 TV spots (Beta videocassette), September 21, 1984
1008
14
The Tuesday Team Reagan-Bush '84 Donahue Show (Beta videocassette), September 24, 1984
1008
15
The Tuesday Team Reagan-Bush '84 49 TV spots with enclosed list (Beta videocassette), November 1, 1984

Group 1, Series 5: Reagan Administration Second Term, 1985-1986 1.5 cubic feet

Group 1, Series 5 contains information and materials relating to President Reagan's second and final term as president as well as Laxalt's final term as a U.S. senator. Laxalt decided in 1986 that he would not seek reelection, his retirement from the Senate became effective in January 1987. The files in this series have been arranged chronologically according to months and years. Materials include White House correspondence, constituency correspondence, memoranda and correspondence from the Republican National Committee, news clips, and Laxalt's materials from his trip to the Philippines. The majority of this series consists of correspondence on a variety of topics sent to the White House and answered by Senator Laxalt.

President Reagan was sworn in as president for a second time in January 1985. His second term was marked by a variety of significant domestic and international issues including the "War on Drugs," the Challenger (space shuttle) disaster, the 1986 bombing of Libya, the Immigration and Control Act of 1986, the Iran-Contra affair, and the ending of the Cold War. Some of these issues are reflected in the constituency correspondence located in this series. By most standards, the Reagan presidency was a success, the economy improved, the Cold War concluded without bloodshed, the Republican Party rebuilt and reestablished itself. Throughout most of these events, Laxalt was there by Reagan's side as a political advisor and as a friend.

Box
Folder
Contents
382
1
White House correspondence regarding presidential appearances, 1985
382
2
Laxalt Republican National Committee materials, 1985
382
3
News clip and articles regarding Reagan administration policies and politics, 1985-1986
382
4
Laxalt's statement on the Philippines, 1985-1986
382
5
Philippines trip press requests, 1985-1986
382
6
Various Republican National Committee materials, 1985-1986
382
7
Frank Fahrenkopf correspondence and memoranda, 1985-1986
382
8
Ollie Kinney correspondence and memoranda, 1985-1986
382
9
White House correspondence to the President answered by Laxalt, January-March 1985
382
10
Presidential correspondence, February-March 1985
382
11
Political Division Briefing Regional Strategy Session, March 1985
382
12
White House correspondence to the president answered by Laxalt, April-June 1985
382
13
Republican National Committee correspondence (contains photo of George Bush), April-July 1985
382
14
White House correspondence to the president answered by Laxalt, July-August 1985
382
15
White House correspondence to the president answered by Laxalt, September-December 1985
382
16
Laxalt's Philippines file regarding political situation following his visit, part 1, 1986
382
17
Laxalt's Philippines file regarding political situation following his visit, part 2, 1986
382
18
Laxalt statements regarding the President, 1986
382
19
Republican National Committee correspondence, January-May 1986
382
20
President Reagan's visit to Las Vegas for Jim Santini fundraiser (includes photo of Santini, Reagan, and Laxalt), June 1986
382
21
White House correspondence to the president answered by Laxalt, January-February 1986
382
22
White House correspondence to the president answered by Laxalt, March-June 1986
Box
Folder
Contents
1007
1
Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation materials, April-October 1986
1007
2
White House requests to the president answered by Laxalt, July-September 1986
1007
3
White House requests to the president answered by Laxalt, October-December 1986
Box
Folder
Contents
1008
16
Inside Reagan's White House (Beta videocassette), January 1985
1008
17
Nightwatch on CBS segment on Life After Reagan (VHS tape), 1986
1008
18
Reagan Revolution (VHS tape), April 28, 1986

Group 1, Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1975-1985 9.25 cubic feet

Group 1, Series 6 consists of scrapbooks. The scrapbooks within this series contains materials that relate to Reagan's presidential campaigns, policies of the Reagan Administration, Laxalt's relationship and role within that administration, Laxalt's trip to the Philippines, and inauguration events. The scrapbooks are comprised of news clips, memorabilia, campaign flyers and buttons, photographs, and correspondence. This series begins with folders in Box 1007 that contain photocopies of the indexes from some of the scrapbooks. The indexes have been arranged chronologically according to months and years. The information that follows is comprised of descriptions of other relevant scrapbooks that did not contain indexes. These have been placed in a rough chronological order according to year. It is also important to note that some boxes contain more than one scrapbook.

Box
Folder
Contents
1007
4
Indexes from scrapbooks in Box 790, July-December 1975
1007
4
Indexes from scrapbooks in Boxes 791-793, 1976
1007
4
Indexes from scrapbooks in Boxes 806 and 811, October-December 1979
1007
4
Indexes from scrapbooks in Boxes 806-811, 1980
1007
4
Indexes from scrapbooks in Box 812, January-February 1981
1007
4
Indexes from scrapbooks in Boxes 827-832, 1984
Box
Item
Contents
851
1
News clips that deal with Reagan’s campaign in January-July 1976. The news clips include Laxalt’s general comments on Reagan’s campaign, the philosophy and the strategy behind the campaign. 58 pages, January-July 1976
Box
Item
Contents
852
1
1976 Republican Convention. The scrapbook includes photographs of Reagan, Laxalt and Reagan’s campaign staff, news clips from 1975-1976, notes on the campaign and a large number of campaign materials (brochures, buttons, pins, stickers and flyers). 74 pages, 1975-1976
Box
Item
Contents
853
1
News clips related to the GOP National Convention in August 1976. The news articles address the course of the Convention in Kansas City and Reagan’s loss of the Presidential nomination. A few news clips deal with the analysis of Reagan’s mistakes in the 1976 campaign. 86 pages, 1976
Box
Item
Contents
854
1
1976 Republican Convention (vol. 1) includes Reagan’s GOP Convention schedule, news clips and photos from the Convention. Several news clips contain information about early campaign risks and predictions, the course of the campaign, Reagan’s fundraising efforts and the men behind Reagan’s campaign. 68 pages, 1976
854
2
1976 Republican Convention (vol. 2) includes a thank you letter from Reagan to Laxalt, post-Convention news clips. Several photos include pictures of Reagan and Laxalt from the 1976 GOP Convention, and a picture of Reagan’s visit to Laxalt’s office. 15 pages, 1976
Box
Item
Contents
947
1
Book on the First Reagan Administration prepared by the Citizens for the Republic (CFTR). The book presents photographs and short biographies for each member of the Administration. The box also contains the Citizens for the Republic flyer with the information about CFTR, dates to 1981, 1981
Box
Item
Contents
931
1
President Reagan’s six years in office (1981-1986) and his relationship with Laxalt. The scrapbook contains several thank you letters from Reagan to Laxalt, multiple White House photos, news and magazine clippings, Laxalt’s invitations to official White House events. 94 pages, 1981-1986
Box
Item
Contents
812
1
News clips regarding Reagan’s Presidency and Laxalt’s comments on Reagan as President. 168 pages, January 1, 1981-April 30, 1981
812
2
General news clips from January-February 1981. 195 pages, January-February 1981
Box
Item
Contents
891
1
1984 Presidential Campaign. The news clips and articles focus on Reagan’s decision to run for re-election, and subsequent interviews with Reagan and Laxalt regarding the re-election campaign. The scrapbook includes the letter of support for the campaign from Senator Baker and the cover of Newsweek dedicated to Reagan’s re-election campaign. 80 pages, 1984
Box
Item
Contents
892
1
1984 Presidential Campaign with a particular focus on the Presidential and Vice-Presidential debates. News clips and articles focus on the intensity of the race and concerns over Reagan’s age in the re-election campaign. The scrapbook includes tickets from the Presidential debates in Louisville, Kentucky and the Vice-Presidential debates in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 72 pages, 1984
Box
Item
Contents
893
1
End of the 1984 Presidential Campaign and a subsequent re-election of Reagan. It contains articles and news clips focusing on the end of the campaign and Reagan’s victory. The scrapbook also includes a thank-you letter from Reagan to Laxalt for his work in the campaign and the draft of Reagan’s travel itinerary for November 1-2, 1984. 14 pages, 1984
Box
Item
Contents
894
1
1984 Republican National Convention. It contains magazine articles, news clips, photos of Reagan and Laxalt, as well as invitations to the RNC. 72 pages, 1984
Box
Item
Contents
895
1
Second Inaugural Scrapbook from January 1985. It mainly consists of newspaper clippings and magazine covers dedicated to the Inauguration ceremony. 61 pages, 1985
Box
Item
Contents
946
1
1985 Presidential Inaugural Ball. It contains a number of invitations, program materials, the plan for inaugural ceremonies, name cards, news clips from the Inauguration, and photographs of Reagan and Bush. 27 pages, 1985
Box
Item
Contents
930
1
Laxalt’s trip to the Philippines in 1985. It contains news clips regarding Reagan’s decision to send Laxalt to the Philippines with a diplomatic mission and a few photos documenting Laxalt’s return to the U. S. 72 pages, 1985
Box
Item
Contents
932
1
News clips related to Laxalt's ties to Reagan and Laxalt's possible Presidential bid. 80 pages, March 4-July 14 1986
Box
Item
Contents
933
1
News clips related to Laxalt's possible Presidential bid and the support he would garner from the Reagan administration. 84 pages, June-August 1986