Overview

Title: Louis E. Lomax Papers
Creator(s): Lomax, Louis E., 1922-1970
Collection Number: 82-30
Dates (inclusive): 1943-1972
Physical Extent: 14.0 cubic feet (18 boxes)
Preferred Citation note: Louis E. Lomax Papers, 82-30. Special Collections, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno.
Repository: University of Nevada, Reno. Special Collections Department
Permanent Link: http://dewey.library.unr.edu/xtf/view?docId=ead/82-30-ead.xml

Biographical Note

Louis E. Lomax was a native of Valdosta, Georgia, born August 16, 1922. His mother, Sarah Louise Lomax, died when he was eight days old, and he was raised by his grandparents, and his grandmother Rozena Lomax became his guardian. At the age of three, his mother’s brother and his wife James L. and Fannie H. Lomax, raised him. He received his undergraduate training at Paine College in Augusta, Georgia and completed a M.A. in Sociology at the American University, Washington, D. C., in 1944, and a M.A. in Philosophy at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut in 1947. Lomax began his professional career as Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Georgia State College in Savannah.

At the age of 22, Lomax turned to writing. He served as a feature writer for the Afro-American and the Chicago American. He was the first black journalist to be hired by William Randolph Hearst when he went to work for the Chicago American in 1948. His articles appeared in most of the major magazines, including Look, The Saturday Evening Post, Newsweek, Ebony, The Nation, The New Leader, and Harper’s Magazine.

Lomax published a number of books with Harper and Row. His first book, The Reluctant African, won the Saturday Review Annisfield-Wolf Award for 1960. His next book, The Negro Revolt, was considered to be the definitive work on race relations in America, and was translated into many languages and used as a textbook in many schools. His third book, When the Word is Given, written in 1963, was called a classic study of the Black Muslim movement. In 1967 he published Thailand: The War That Is, the War That Will Be with Random House, in which he criticized the U.S. Government for dishonesty and deliberate obfuscation in its handling of the U.S. mission in Vietnam and Thailand. In research for this book Lomax traveled to both countries and supported his assertions with on-the-spot reporting. In 1968 he published To Kill a Blackman: The Shocking Parallel in the Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., in which he looked at the assassinations of both men and the society in which they lived.

Lomax’s popularity as an author gave him the opportunity to appear before different audiences on the lecture circuit to talk about his books as well as other topics of interest which he wrote and spoke about through the years. He was a firm believer in integration. He lectured across America and in Canada. He appeared on many television shows including the Jack Paar Show, the Merv Griffin Show, as well as on broadcast television news.

In 1958 he became the first African–American television journalist when he joined New York’s WNTA-TV, where Mike Wallace worked. When he was working as a journalist he met Wallace who he was supposed to interview for a TV magazine. Wallace was impressed with Lomax and hired him to be one of his special interviewers for his television show. Wallace learned about the Nation of Islam from Lomax, and in 1959 they embarked on a five-part documentary they called The Hate That Hate Produced, in which the viewing public heard about its views from its leader Elijah Muhammad and spokesperson Malcolm X. Lomax wrote the script, co-produced it and was the reporter who conducted the interviews.

Lomax wrote the film script around 1968 for “Malcolm X” based upon his research for his 1963 book When the Word Is Given, which was considered a definitive report on the Back Muslim leadership of Elijah Muhammad and Malcolm X. He updated that research for his film treatment for Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, but the movie was not produced.

Lomax’s writings appeared in newspapers, popular magazines and in other formats. In 1968 he worked with illustrator Dan Sherwood on a series of cartoon strips which were written by Lomax and drawn by Sherwood for the National News Syndication, Inc. He worked with newspaper syndicates the North American Newspaper Alliance and the Bell-McClure Syndicate, writing columns for their readers on a variety of subjects. Usually these topics revolved about the condition of African-Americans and their fight for equality against an established political and economic system, but politicians also came within his crosshairs.

In 1966 Lomax moved to Los Angeles where he hosted a semi-weekly television show on local station KTTV, Channel 11. The show aired every Thursday and Sunday evenings. The format was a discussion about the latest topics and controversies. He also had a daily radio call-in program he called “The World of Louis Lomax” on station KYDAY. He was the 1966 Unity Award winner selected as "the TV-radio personality who made the most valuable contributions to interracial understanding during the year." During his time in Los Angeles before coming to KTTV as a host, he worked on the documentary Walk in My Shoes. He was awarded a $100,000 grant to implement a summer project called "Operation Cool-It" that involved 20,000 Los Angeles youths. In 1967 he was awarded an Emmy for his 19-hour "Job-A-Thon" on KTTV which produced 35,000 jobs for Los Angeles residents, as well as commendations from the city and county of Los Angeles, and the State Legislature.

In 1969 he left Los Angeles and took a job teaching at Hofstra University in Hampstead, New York. He was appointed a visiting professor of humanities and social sciences, where he was to help incorporate Afro-American culture into the total educational program of its student body, both black and white. He also worked with regional school districts and academics to advance that historical understanding.

While on a trip in New Mexico, Lomax died in a car accident on July 30, 1970. Witnesses said he was trying to pass another vehicle on a two-lane road at a high speed and lost control. He was not wearing a seatbelt and died at the scene. His funeral was held in Los Angeles with a memorial also held at Hofstra University. It was a shocking end to a man for whom so many had relied on as being a spokesperson and rational voice for integration during a time of social upheaval in the United States.

Louis Lomax was married three times, first to Betty Frank, with whom he had a son, from 1958-1961. His second marriage was to Wanda Kay in 1961, with whom he was granted a default divorce on April 21, 1967. They had no children. He married Robinette Glivel Kirk in 1968. This was the second marriage for Robinette, who had been an assistant to Lomax during his time in Los Angeles. Lomax was buried at Rosedale Cemetery in Los Angeles.

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Scope and Content

The collection was given to the Special Collections in 1981 by his widow, Robinette Lomax. It is not clear why Mrs. Lomax pulled the materials from Hofstra University, where work had gone on to create a Louis E. Lomax Memorial Library Collection after her husband’s death in 1970, to be placed here. However, she did move to Nevada at some point to be closer to relatives. A niece worked at the University of Nevada, Reno for a few years in the 1970s, so she could have been familiar with campus. It may have been for that reason, or at the urging of UNR Political Science professor Elmer Rusco, who had been assembling information about blacks in Nevada.

The Lomax materials include his writings for books, articles, newspapers, and screenplays. There are also scrapbooks, clippings, plaques, recordings, and some ephemera. The books Lomax wrote are available in Special Collections. The collection is organized into 10 series: Series 1: Book Publications; Series 2: Television and Film Scripts, Cartoon Strip; Series 3: Newspaper Columns and Stories; Series 4: Articles; Series 5: Speaking Engagements; Series 6: KTTV Television Show; Series 7: Hofstra University; Series 8: Personal; Series 9: Robinette Kirk Lomax; and Series 10: Recordings. Series 1, 2 and 8 are further divided into subseries.

In Series 1: Book Publications, there is correspondence in Subseries 1 with Harper & Row, one of his book publishers. Lomax often approached the publisher with book ideas. Included are five book titles, only four of which were published. They include: Subseries 2: The Reluctant African; Subseries 3: The Negro Revolt; Subseries 4: Thailand: The War That Is, the War That Will Be; and Subseries 5: To Kill a Blackman: The Shocking Parallel in the Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. For each of these titles, there are various research materials, usually reviews, some correspondence, publicity pieces, and work which Lomax many have completed on a trip to another country. Subseries 6 includes a novel which was under consideration by Harper & Row but not published, The Wheel and the Cistern. Not all of his books are represented in this collection. His 1963 book When the Word is Given, about the death of Malcolm X and upon which he based his movie screenplay “Malcolm X” was not received.

Series 2: Television and Film Scripts, Cartoon Strip is organized into three Subseries: 1) The Hate That Hate Produced; 2) “Malcom X” Film Script; and 3) “Deadline” Cartoon Strip. The Hate That Hate Produced was presented and narrated by Mike Wallace on his “Newsbeat” show in New York as a two-hour, five part series on the Nation of Islam and the “Black Supremacy Movement” in July 1959. He had hired Lomax as a reporter on his show and worked with him on the project after learning about its leaders Malcolm X and Elijah Muhammad. Lomax wrote the script, co-produced it with Wallace, and was the onscreen reporter. The script included was one presented with additional footage on July 23, one week after the series had aired. The collection does not include any footage of the show.

The “Malcolm X” film script in Series 2, Subseries 2 is a treatment Lomax did for 20th Century-Fox Film Corporation. Lomax used his 1963 book When the Word is Given as the basis for his work and updated it. The materials do not include any correspondence or other information concerning the research he conducted, and the script is not complete.

Series 2, Subseries 3 contains the typed scripts and copies of the cartoon strips which were written by Lomax and drawn by Dan Sherwood for the National News Syndication, Inc. for publication in 1968. The strip tells the story of African-American reporter Ronald Curtis, assigned by World Press Service to infiltrate a ghetto dope ring, set in an unnamed city in the eastern part of the United States. Some similarities to Lomax can be seen in the drawings and the work of the reporter.

Series 3: Newspaper Columns and Stories, contains clippings of the columns Lomax wrote for two newspaper syndicates, the North American Newspaper Alliance and the Bell-McClure Syndicate. Lomax covered a number of cities who were experiencing unrest and wrote about them, including Newark, New Jersey and the riots in Detroit. He wrote about searching for the killer of Martin Luther King by following the same route James Earl Ray took, in order to find clues which the FBI said they had not been able to find. No all of his columns are included.

Series 4: Articles, covers the articles which were published in a variety of popular magazine, such as Life, Harper’s Magazine, Saturday Review, Ebony, Pageant, Newsweek, The Nation, and The Saturday Evening Post. This series is not complete for all of his articles. While at Hofstra University, Lomax was able to verify the date of birth of the first black poet in America, Jupiter Hammon. Information on that finding is included. Many of the articles may be the original typed copies and may not include any citation information on publication.

Series 5: Speaking Engagements, does not do justice to the number of lectures, talks or events which Lomax appeared at as it seems he was on the move across the country and also spoke internationally. This series does contain clippings about his talks, some press releases or flyers about his talks, and some programs from the events. It does not contain any of the speeches Lomax delivered, however many of his speaking engagements were recorded and can be found in Series 10: Recordings.

Series 6: KTTV Television Show, highlights the work Lomax did with Channel 11 in Los Angeles, on his semi-weekly television show, The Louis Lomax Show, from 1966 to 1970. He invited guests to discuss topics of the day, often talking with those either for or against the topic. It was a popular show, and gave Lomax a place to often debate and share his views with those he interviewed to his television audience. In 1967 Lomax, who was concerned about the high rate of unemployment among those in the inner city of Los Angeles and the unrest it could lead to, held a 19-hour “Job-A-Thon” which produced 35,000 jobs for Los Angeles residents. For this work he won an Emmy.

In March 1969, Lomax quit KTTV and his show in order to take a teaching position at Hofstra University in New York. In Series 7: Hofstra University, there are different aspects of what he undertook, who, as a respected national expert on the history and culture of African-Americans due to his writing and public speaking, was asked to incorporate these areas into the school’s curriculum. During his time at teaching at Hofstra it was his aim to put together a three-volume history about black America, which was interrupted by his death in July 1970. Mrs. Lomax worked with the campus to create a Louis E. Lomax Memorial Collection with the aim to comprehensively collect everything about Lomax that could be found.

Series 8: Personal, contains other personal information about Lomax. The series is further divided into these Subseries: 1) Appointment Books; 2) Legal and Financial; 3) Correspondence; 4) Lomax Information; 5) Research Subject Files; 6) Scrapbooks and Clippings on Louis Lomax; and 7) Death of Louis Lomax. His appointment books in Subseries 1 contain scattered information about events and random notes. Lomax was married three times, and Subseries 2 has information about his divorces and other legal problems he encountered, such as his tax evasion indictment in 1970. This subseries also included various contracts he had with publishers or for speaking events or other work. Subseries 3 contains correspondence Lomax had during the years 1963 to 1970. The correspondence is very slim during the early years of the civil rights movement and does not contain any from personages from that time. More of the correspondence concerns Lomax’s speaking engagements and other professional concern.

Series 8, Subseries 4 includes other information about Lomax which could not be included in our series, such things as his honors and other recognitions, information about his trips abroad to Africa and the Middle East, and work on curriculum concerning African-American culture and history. Again, concerned about those in the inner city, he held “Operation Cool-It” which involved getting 20,000 a chance to experience going to Catalina Island during the summer. An unusual habit Lomax had was taking hotel room keys from his travels as souvenirs, so Box 18 contains them, his glasses and case, plus a few other ephemera.

Series 8, Subseries 5: Research Subject Files, contains clippings and other articles Lomax kept in order to have background about various subjects he was interested in knowing more about or which he anticipated needing for his teaching at Hofstra. Always focused in maintaining his own archive of his professional life, Subseries 6: Scrapbooks and Clippings covers the years from 1958 until his death, and can assist with information not found in other sections of this collection. Subseries 7: Death of Louis Lomax, has some information about the car accident in New Mexico and the ensuing funeral service which was held in Los Angeles.

Series 9: Robinette Kirk Lomax, Lomax’s third wife, was shocked by his unexpected death, and pursued a possible conspiracy idea through a court case, suing Ford Motor Company about the car her husband had been driving that day, as well as contacting a psychic for answers. She created a number of ways to continue his legacy, such as a proposed Louis Lomax Chair at the Claremont Colleges in California, as well the work at Hofstra, found in Series 7. This section includes information on her continued work with the Congressional Black Caucus, and about her children from a former marriage.

Series 10: Recordings, covers both audio and 16mm film footage. The audio recordings are mainly on reel-to-reel tapes of his speeches, lectures, and other events across the country. They have not been converted to digital format. The film footage is not clearly identified but most likely covers his visit to the Middle East in 1968, and must have been undertaken as some professional project, possibly for his continued relationship with KTTV in Los Angeles. It is not known if that is the case or if the project was ever completed.

Restrictions

Collection is open for research. Materials must be used on-site; advance notice suggested. Access to parts of this collection may be restricted under provisions of state or federal law.

Immediate Source of Acquisition note

Donated by Mrs. Robinette Lomax on January 8, 1981.

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Arrangement note

  • Arranged in the following series and subseries: 1) Book Publications; 1.1) Correspondence with Publisher Harper and Row; 1.2) Books: The Reluctant African; 1.3) Books: The Negro Revolt; 1.4) Books: Thailand: The War That Is, the War That Will Be; 1.5) Books: To Kill a Blackman; 1.6) Books: The Wheel and the Cistern; 2) Television and Film Scripts, Cartoon Strip; 2.1) The Hate That Hate Produced; 2.2) “Malcom X” Film Script; 2.3: “Deadline” Cartoon Strip; 3) Newspaper Columns and Stories; 4) Articles; 5) Speaking Engagements; 6) KTTV Television's Louis Lomax Show; 7) Hofstra University; 8) Personal; 8.1) Appointment Books; 8.2) Legal and Financial; 8.3) Correspondence; 8.4) Lomax Information; 8.5) Research Subject Files; 8.6) Scrapbooks and Clippings on Louis Lomax; 8.7) Death of Louis Lomax; 9) Robinette Kirk Lomax; 10) Recordings

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Index Terms

This collection is indexed under the following headings in the online catalog of the University Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno. Researchers wishing to find related materials are encouraged to use the following index terms:

People:

Subjects:

Geographic Locations:



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Administrative Information

Collection processed by Jacquelyn Sundstrand, March 2018. Finding aid prepared by Jacquelyn Sundstrand, March 2018. This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit on April 12, 2018.

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Detailed Description of the Records

Series 1: Book Publications

Series 1 covers Louis Lomax’s writings for book publications. More of his book publishing was with Harper & Row and their correspondence indicates work which they accepted for publication as well as projects they turned down which he proposed. Information about each of the books may include some manuscripts as well as reviews appearing in various journals or newspapers. Some of the book research required trips overseas, such as his ones on Africa and Thailand, so any background materials Lomax collected before or during his visit is included. Not all of his work on his published books are represented here. Included titles are: The Reluctant African (1960); The Negro Revolt (1962); Thailand: The War That Is, the War That Will Be (Random House, 1967); and To Kill a Blackman (1968). Also included is the manuscript for The Wheel and the Cistern, a novel begun about 1943, which was under publication consideration by Harper & Row, but not published due to Lomax’s death in 1971.

Copies of his published books and any translations have been placed in the Special Collections book collection. Translations can be found in French, German, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Hebrew, Polish, and Chinese.

Series 1, Subseries 1: Correspondence with Harper and Row, 1960-1971 (5 folders)

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folder
Contents
1
1
Correspondence with publisher Harper and Row, 1960
1
2
Correspondence with publisher Harper and Row, 1961
1
3
Correspondence with publisher Harper and Row, 1962
1
4
Correspondence with Harper and Row, with Lomax and others, 1963-1968
1
5
Books: Harper and Row Royalty Reports, 1970-1971

Series 1, Subseries 2: Books: The Reluctant African, 1960-1963 (5 folders)

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folder
Contents
1
6
Scrapbook of reviews, flyers, letters etc., 1960-1961
1
7
Reviews, 1960-1961, undated
1
8
Trip to London, Hamburg and Berlin, and research materials for Reluctant African, 1963
1
9
Africa trips, coverage of Lomax in Africa, 1960
1
10
Research materials on Africa for The Reluctant African, 1961, undated

Series 1, Subseries 3: Books: The Negro Revolt, 1962-1972; undated (10 folders)

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folder
Contents
1
11
Reviews of 1962 edition, correspondence, 1962, 1966
1
12
Interview press release, undated
1
13
Reviews, 1962
1
13
Epilogue drafts, Part 1 and Part 2 (rough), undated
1
14
Epilogue drafts, Part 1 and Part 2, undated
1
15
Negro Revolt rough draft Epilogue (3 parts) and 8 years later, 9 years later, undated
1
16
Epilogue to The Negro Revolt: photocopy of 1st draft for the 2nd (updated) edition, undated
1
17
Preface to the new edition and publisher comments, 1969
1
18
Harper and Row correspondence with Robinette Lomax, 1971
1
19
Harper and Row work on final reprint with new epilogues, 1970-1972

Series 1, Subseries 4: Books: Thailand: The War That Is, the War That Will Be, 1964-1972 (19 folders)

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folder
Contents
1
20
Chapter drafts, undated
1
21
Manuscript draft (title page- page 168) with mark ups, undated
1
22
Manuscript typescript, undated
1
23
Work with publisher Random House, undated
1
24
Reviews, 1967-1968
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folder
Contents
2
1
Correspondence from Lomax. Includes information on trip to Hanoi and other telegrams, 1966-1967
2
2
Lomax's Thailand trip notebook, December 1966- February 1967
2
3
Background materials on people and Thai government, undated
2
4
Background information: offprint publications, 1964, 1967
2
5
Background information from U.S. Press Kit for Thailand, 1950-1966
2
6
Background information from United Nations, 1967
2
7
Background publication: Skinner, G. William. The Thailand Chinese: Assimilation in a Changing Society. Thailand Council of the Asia Society, March 1963
2
8
Background publication: Atlantic magazine issue on Thailand, December 1966
2
9
Background publication: Moseley, George. The Chinese in North Thailand, January 1967
2
10
Background information: maps, undated
2
11
Background information: Miscellaneous statements, conferences, correspondence, 1966-1967
2
12
Research materials and clippings, 1967, 1972
2
13
Research on Vietnam: Congressional hearings and journals, 1966-1967
2
14
Vietnam clippings, 1967-1969

Series 1, Subseries 5: Books: To Kill a Blackman: The Shocking Parallel in the Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., circa 1968; undated (6 folders)

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folder
Contents
2
15
Original manuscript, typed and edited by Lomax, undated
2
16
Rough draft. Introduction and chapters 1-5, undated
2
17
Rough draft. Chapter 6. (Includes transcript of TV documentary "The Hate that Hate Produced" with Mike Wallace July 23, 1959), July 23, 1959; undated
2
18
Rough draft. Chapters 7-12, undated
2
19
Rough draft. Chapters 13-17, undated
2
20
Publicity flyers, circa 1968

Series 1, Subseries 6: Books: The Wheel and the Cistern, circa 1943; 1971 (3 folders)

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folder
Contents
2
21
Handwritten manuscript of novel, 10 pages, circa 1943
2
22
Manuscript of typescript, undated
2
23
Harper and Row copy (bound), January 29, 1971

Series 2: Television and Film Scripts, Cartoon Strip

The Hate that Hate Produced was presented by Mike Wallace on New York television station WNTA, Channel 13 as a two-hour, five-part series beginning July 13, 1959. Narrated by Wallace, the script was written and co-produced by Louis Lomax to present the rise of black racism and the growth of the “Black Supremacy Movement.” Wallace became interested in telling the story of the Nation of Islam after learning about it from Lomax, whom Wallace hired to work at the station on his “Newsbeat” program. Lomax appeared as the “Newsbeat” reporter conducting the interviews with Nation of Islam and United African Nationalist Movement representatives, leaders and others including Malcolm X, Adam Clayton Powell, John Davis, James R. Lawson, and Elijah Muhammad. The series was conceived to show viewers how these groups were pro-segregation, anti-white, anti-Christian, and anti-Semitic, which included detailed threats of organized violence to both blacks and whites. Footage was shot over a two-month period around New York City.

The television script included in Series 2, Subseries 1 is one which was presented with additional footage on July 23, 1959, one week after the final episode aired after the series received considerable attention. The scrapbook contains copies of some of the press releases about the upcoming show as well as reviews and other clippings and letters received after the airing.

Lomax wrote the film script for the movie “Malcolm X” based upon his 1963 book When the Word Is Given. The film treatment was based upon additional research he conducted into the life and death of Malcolm X who was murdered in March 1965. At that time, the leader had split with the Black Muslim movement and had begun his own brand of Black Nationalism. Production on the movie was set to begin in the spring of 1968 by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation. At the same time, a second film about Malcolm X was also set to be written by James Baldwin, who was adapting The Autobiography of Malcolm X, written with Alex Haley, for Columbia Pictures. Neither film was produced at that time. Included in Series 2, Subseries 2 are incomplete film scripts, notes, and two folders of items given to Lomax as models for his work: the 1959 treatment by Ernest Lehman for the screenplay From the Terrace, by John O’Hara; and the 1967 call sheets for the movie The Ghost and Mrs. Muir.

Series 2, Subseries 3 contains the typed scripts and copies of the cartoon strips which were written by Lomax and drawn by Dan Sherwood for the National News Syndication, Inc. for publication in 1968. The strip tells the story of African-American reporter Ronald Curtis, assigned by World Press Service to infiltrate a ghetto dope ring, set in an unnamed city in the eastern part of the United States. There is no information about which newspapers may have carried the strip or how it was received by the public.

Series 2, Subseries 1: The Hate that Hate Produced, July 1959 (2 folders)

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folder
Contents
2
24
TV Script: "The Hate that Hate Produced" presented by Mike Wallace, WNTA-TV Channel 13, New York, July 23, 1959
2
25
TV Script: "The Hate that Hate Produced" Scrapbook, 1959

Series 2, Subseries 2: "Malcolm X" Film Script, 1959-1968 (7 folders)

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folder
Contents
3
1
Film script, original typed manuscript, pages 1-85 (not complete), undated
3
2
Film script, copy pages 1-85 (not complete), undated
3
3
Film script notes, undated
3
4
Rights contract with 20th Century-Fox Film Corporation. (unsigned), January 29, 1968
3
5
Screenplay: John O'Hara's From the Terrace, treatment by Ernest Lehman, April 3, 1959
3
6
Production call sheets for the movie The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, by 20th Century-Fox Films, 1967
3
7
News clips, reviews, 1967

Series 2, Subseries 3: "Deadline" Cartoon Strip Written by Louis Lomax and Dan Sherwood, 1968 (2 folders)

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folder
Contents
3
8
Scripts for weeks 1-9, undated
3
9
Strips #1-18, 25-47, 1968

Series 3: Newspaper Columns and Stories, 1963-1968 (10 folders)

Lomax wrote extensively for newspapers through the years, many of his columns being carried by the North American Newspaper Alliance, others by the Bell-McClure Syndicate. In his first series, called “The Negro Says Now!—Or Never” in the Times Union, Albany, New York, he wrote about the interracial tensions in that city which he said may erupt “in the not too distant future.” The current status, struggles and feelings of African-Americans throughout the nation during the 1960s was a focus found in his columns as well as his other publications, but his views were wide-ranging on the current world in which he lived. While he was devoted to forwarding integration, he often commented on many of the political and legal institutions which stood in the way of race equality.

One of his most interesting series of columns were the ones in which he searched for James Earl Ray, the killer of Martin Luther King Jr., with Charles Stein who had accompanied Ray on his trip from Los Angeles to New Orleans. In repeating that trip, their purpose was to the find the people Ray had contacted along the way and the phone booth Ray used to talk to a contact in New Orleans, in order to offer new clues which, it was said, the FBI had failed to find in their investigation.

The columns come in three formats: 1) typed by Lomax, often with handwritten corrections; 2) final columns printed by the syndicates on legal pages; and 3) the clippings cut from the newspapers. The bulk of the formats are Lomax’s typed copies and the printed final texts as published. Contracts for Lomax’s work with the newspaper syndicates can be found in Series 8: Personal, Subseries 2: Legal and Financial.

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folder
Contents
3
10
Albany, New York Times Union columns, (North American Newspaper Alliance), July 7-12, 1963
3
11
Columns for North American Newspaper Alliance, 1966-1968
3
12
Columns for North American Newspaper Alliance, drafts on Charles Stein/ James Earl Ray columns, 1967
3
13
Newark, New Jersey Star-Ledger articles regarding "Black Revolutionaries in Newark" (series of five articles), August 27-31, 1967
3
14
"The Lomax Column" Bell-McClure Syndicate, 1967
3
15
"The Lomax Column" on Ronald Reagan, 1967
3
16
"The Lomax Column", 1968
3
17
"The Lomax Column" undated from 1967-1968, 1967-1968
3
18
Columns appearing in various newspapers, 1963-1968
3
19
Columns on Detroit Riots, 1967

Series 4: Articles, 1957-1970; undated (19 folders)

Interspersed with his newspaper columns, Lomax wrote a number of articles which appeared in popular magazines of the time. They included Life, Pageant, Harper’s Magazine, Saturday Review, Ebony, Newsweek, The Nation, and The Saturday Evening Post. The copies found in Series 4 may or may not have information about what magazine published the article or if it was published. Most are the typewritten copies Lomax made, some with his contact information, others with that of his agent.

His article “The American Negro’s New Comedy Act” which appeared in Harper’s Magazine was selected as one of the “Ten outstanding Magazine Articles Selected by Council of Librarians” in 1961. The flyer for that selection is included but not a copy of the article.

Lomax also wrote an article about the NAACP which appeared in Harper’s Magazine in June 1960, entitled “The Negro Revolt Against the Negro Leaders.” In it he wrote that the organization was no longer the prime mover of African-Americans’ push against segregation during the Civil Rights era, and that the organization’s leaders had not kept up with the times, as demonstrated in the mass lunch counter demonstrations by youth in the South. While at Hofstra University in 1970, Lomax conducted research and discovered that the first black poet in America was not Phyllis Wheatly, as widely held, but rather a New York slave named Jupiter Hammon. In working with graduate student Lillian Koppel, they found documents which verified the date of Hammon’s birth as October 17, 1711. Until this find scholars had been unable to certify the time of the Hammon’s birth.

Additional copies of Lomax’s articles and bibliographic citations may be found in Series 7: Hofstra University.

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folder
Contents
3
20
"Inter-racial marriage: an American Dilemma" by Lomax in Pageant, 13(5) (not complete), November 6-12, 1957
3
21
Nomination of Senator Barry Goldwater as Republican candidate for Presidency, 1963
3
22
Paul Robeson, 1963
3
23
"A Negro Assays Lyndon Baines Johnson", 1963
3
24
"Journey into Bogalusa" by Lomax, circa 1965
3
25
Untitled article, concerns of role of revolution in human progress, circa 1966-1967
3
26
"How the CIA overthrew the government of Afghanistan" by Abdul and Lomax, first draft, circa January 1967
3
27
"Speaking out: It's time for the Arab case to be stated effectively" submitted to and rejected by Saturday Evening Post, 1968
3
28
"Memo from Ammam", circa 1968
3
29
"On coming to Hofstra" by Lomax, submitted to Saturday Review but not published and returned to Hofstra, 1969-1970
3
30
"Jupiter Hammon" (America's first Negro poet), April 1970
3
31
"Jupiter Hammon" research materials and publicity, 1915, 1970
3
32
"Washington, D.C. Poverty Project", undated
3
33
"Alternative to a Long Hot Summer" by Lomax, undated
3
34
Publicity flyer for "Ten outstanding Magazine Articles Selected by Council of Librarians" for Lomax article "The American Negro's New Comedy Act" in Harper's Magazine, June 1961
3
35
"Trip to Hanoi", 1967
3
36
"Switzerland", undated
3
37
Jerusalem and the dollar crises, undated
3
38
Clippings responding to Harper's Magazine article by Lomax on NAACP, June 1960
3
39
"Mississippi Eyewitness" by Lomax (pages 20-24) in Ramparts, Special Collector's Edition for 1968, 1964

Series 5: Speaking Engagements, 1960-1969 (18 folders)

Lomax went on the lecture circuit beginning in 1960. Building from his successful book publications, he toured the nation speaking about his conclusions and observations as well as discussing areas he wrote about in his columns and articles. He was a popular speaker and spoke in all sorts of venues, from churches to high schools and colleges, in public auditoriums or by special invitations of various organizations. Since he had visited and written about Vietnam, Thailand, and Africa, he was able to talk about his first hand observations. His visit and observations on Thailand led him to be a panelist in 1967 at a foreign policy conference about the U.S. involvement in that country. His notoriety also led him to appear in two television shows, one local and one national, and in one film, Wild in the Streets. The scripts or other information for each of these appearances is included.

Most of the folders in Series 5 do not contain the speeches Lomax gave, but usually have press releases or flyers about his upcoming lecture or speech, programs from them, and/or clippings reviewing his engagements.

Many of Lomax’s speaking engagements were recorded. The copies of those recordings can be found in Series 10, Recordings. The talks were recorded on reel-to-reel tapes and are not available in this format for listening.

box
folder
Contents
3
40
Lectures and speeches, 1960
3
41
Lectures and speeches, 1961
3
42
Lectures and speeches, 1963
3
43
Lectures and speeches, 1964
3
44
Lectures and speeches, 1965
3
45
"Challenge '65" Wake Forest College, March 11-13, 1965
3
46
Lectures and speeches, 1966
3
47
Foreign Policy Roundtable conference on "U.S. Involvement in Thailand" Washington University, May 6-7, 1967
3
48
Lectures and Speeches, 1967
3
49
Program for Langston Hughes, UCLA, 1967 or 1968
3
50
Lectures and Speeches, 1968
3
51
"The Inner City: Why it is. What it is." Keynote address at 1969 National Health Forum, New York, March 10, 1969
3
52
Lane Community College, Eugene, Oregon, February 28, 1969
3
53
Lectures and Speeches, 1969
3
54
Lectures and Speeches, 1970
3
55
TV Appearance: Moderator for "The Trouble with Welfare", WITF-TV, Hersey, PA, January 30, 1969
box
folder
Contents
4
1
TV Appearance – "The Danny Thomas Hour My Friend Tony" Script [Lomax as Lt. Moore], August 1967
4
2
Film Appearance: "Wild in the Streets" [see page 69, Lomax as TV commentator], June 27, 1967

Series 6: KTTV Television's Louis Lomax Show, 1966-1970 (11 folders)

In 1966 Lomax moved to Los Angeles where he hosted a semi-weekly television show, the Louis Lomax Show, on local station KTTV, Channel 11. The show aired every Thursday and Sunday evenings. The format was a discussion with guests invited to share their views about the latest topics and controversies. Of particular interest were his shows and debates with conservative pundit William F. Buckley and John H. Rousselot, former U.S. Representative from the Los Angeles area and, at the time of the program, the National Director of the ultraconservative John Birch Society.

In 1967 Lomax was awarded an Emmy for his 19-hour “Job-A-Thon” on KTTV, a project he developed, which produced 35,000 jobs for Los Angeles residents. The plan was to bring together those seeking employment and business firms with available jobs. Both potential employers and viewers seeking employment were asked to call the program and provide descriptions of their jobs or qualifications for jobs. Various civic organizations would then process and match applicants with jobs. The program aired at 11:00 p.m. on Friday, August 25 and continued into the evening the following day, with Lomax and others the masters of ceremonies. For his work, Lomax also received three resolutions, one from the California Legislature, another by the County of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors, and one from the City of Los Angeles.

Materials in this series include guest contacts and topics lists for 1966-1968, his commentary about the Burbank police undertaking a “stop and shake down” of all Blacks who were found in that city during either the day or night, work on the “Job-A-Thon”, and publicity. Also included are sixteen original cartoons by John Bell with Lomax as the subject. No film footage or audio recordings of Lomax on television or on the radio are included in the papers.

During his time in Los Angeles, Lomax was awarded a $100,000 grant to implement a summer project called “Operation Cool-It” that involved 20,000 Los Angeles youths. Information about this project will be found in Series 7: Personal, Subseries 4.

box
folder
Contents
4
3
Guest Contract List: Abortion; Authors; Art; Communists; Dock; Dog Acts; Dope (part 1), 1966-1968
4
4
Guest Contact List: Education; ESP; Homosexuals; Issues; Kooks; Legal; Medical; Naturalists (part 2), 1966-1968
4
5
Guest Contact List: Organizations; Personalities; Politics; Poverty; Religion; Sex; Smut; UFO; War; Women; Youth (part 3), 1966-1968
4
6
Guest and Show topic lists, 1966-1968
4
7
Lomax guest information, 1966, undated
4
8
Lomax Commentary, June 1966
4
9
KTTV's "Job-A-Thon" developed by Lomax, August 25-26, 1967
4
10
Correspondence while at KTTV, 1965-1967
4
11
KTTV sponsored debate between Lomax and John H. Rousselot; William F. Buckley, 1965-1966
4
12
Louis Lomax Show ephemera and publicity, circa 1970
4
13
Original cartoons by John Bell (16 items), undated

Series 7: Hofstra University, 1969-1971 (31 folders)

At 47, Louis Lomax left Los Angeles in 1969 to take up a teaching post at Hofstra University in Hampstead, New York. He said he had received many other offers to teach but chose Hofstra because it was a “school on the way up. I need to get involved in the process of making the university run.” He decided to come back to teaching after almost 20 years because: "The university, after much trauma, is ready to settle down to a relevant education for blacks and whites. I want to be involved in this hassle again."

Lomax was hired on an annual contract, appointed in his first year as Visiting Professor of Humanities and the Social Sciences. He was allowed to choose the courses he would teach as he helped the school incorporate Afro-American culture into the curriculum. During his time at Hofstra, Lomax anticipated writing a three-volume history of Afro-American history, which was part of his contract’s acknowledgement by the administration. During his second year of teaching, he was appointed Writer-in-Residence. His duties incorporated all the responsibilities of a full-time faculty member to teach 12 semester hours each semester.

His teaching at Hofstra allowed him to devise new classes about black history for the curriculum and to undertake work on special educational lectures or conferences for educators in the surrounding region who also wished to know about or add curricula on Afro-American culture and history to their teaching.

The school was shocked to hear of Lomax’s death in an automobile accident in New Mexico on July 30, 1970. He was a respected member of the faculty. Soon thereafter, the school established a Louis E. Lomax Memorial Library Collection in the University Library for his books and papers, co-curated by professor of English Bowman G. Wiley and Lomax’s widow, Robinette Lomax. The plan was to collect copies, in any format, of all his books, writings, lectures, films and speeches, and to use his papers to form a nucleus of an American studies reference library which would become part of a future graduate school of American Studies. The student body voted to also consider establishing a nonviolence institute aimed at studying the causes of violent conflict which would offer credit courses selected from various college departments. The institute would be dedicated to Louis Lomax because of his special insight in the study of violence, nonviolence and American history.

Bowman Wiley took on the project to prepare a chronologically arranged bio-bibliography of every written and spoken presentation of Lomax and to catalog his published and unpublished works together with reviews and other source materials, placing them in the Lomax Memorial Collection. He wrote to those involved with Lomax’s previous professional career in the fall of 1970, asking for originals or copies of those works, correspondence, or other materials for inclusion in the Lomax papers. He was able to include some additional materials from his letters and began to prepare his bibliography, which he hoped to be able to publish. His outgoing correspondence and responses are included in this series, as well as copies of his bibliographical work.

This series includes miscellaneous Hofstra brochures; a run of some of the student newspapers, many which cover stories about Lomax; faculty memos; Lomax’s appointment letters; and his work on black studies classes and lectures both on and off campus. Lomax's writings were reprinted in many books and Bowman Wiley collected many monographs which included them. Photocopies of those excerpts and the books' title pages are included. Correspondence and minutes concerning the planning and work conducted for Lomax Memorial Library Collection is found at the end of the section.

box
folder
Contents
4
14
Hofstra University General Bulletin, 1969-1970
4
15
Hofstra University publications and college brochures, 1968-1971
4
16
Appointment letter; publicity and miscellaneous items, March 25, 1969; 1969-1970
4
17
Hofstra faculty memos, 1969-1970
4
18
Hofstra's student life, 1969-1970
4
19
"The Hofstra Chronicle" student newspaper, 1969-1970
box
folder
Contents
5
1
"The Negro in American History and Thought: Pre-Colonial Africa to the Present" course, American Studies 111, 112, 1969
5
2
Memos to/from Lomax by faculty and administrations, 1969-1970
5
3
Socialist Scholars Conference, Hofstra University; Lomax Lecture on teaching Black Studies, September 5-7, 1969; September 6, 1969
5
4
Black studies program at Hofstra, 1969
5
5
Black studies programs at other colleges, 1970
5
6
Black Scholars Conference on Black Studies, 1970
5
7
Resources on Black Americans for students, undated
5
8
Literary Criticism course (possibly taught by Lomax), undated
5
9
Student correspondence to Lomax, 1970
5
10
Louis Lomax Lecture Series for Suffolk, 1969-1970
5
11
Transcripts of 4 tapes for 8-week lecture series on Afro-American history, culture and sociological analysis for educators through Hofstra's School of Education, 1969
5
12
Long Island Arts Study Committee, June 1970
5
13
"The Negro in Modern American History" by Lomax, for the Hofstra Review, not published, Autumn 1970
5
14
Lomax Memorial Project Steering Committee, 1970
5
15
"Louis E. Lomax Institute of Non-violent Studies" Proposal, October 1970
5
16
Correspondence with Robinette Lomax on establishment of Lomax Memorial Collection, 1970
5
17
Outgoing correspondence requesting information and materials, 1970-1971
5
18
Incoming correspondence for requests for information and materials, 1970-1971
5
19
Bowman Wiley correspondence, 1970-1971
5
20
Work on "Louis E. Lomax Memorial Library Collection" with co-curators Professor Bowman G. Wiley and Mrs. Robinette Lomax, 1970
5
21
Lomax articles collected for the Lomax Collection, undated
5
22
Ilse Pinkus, Secretary to Lomax, Stenographic notebook, 1969-1970
5
23
Books in the personal library of Lomax (possibly a partial listing), undated
5
24
Catalog of Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection at Boston University (photocopy), undated
5
25
Work with Hofstra Lomax Collection on Lomax schedules, engagements and travel in 1963-1965, undated
5
26
Excerpts in books from Lomax writings (photocopies), 1962-1971

Series 8: Personal

Series 8 includes other Lomax items of a personal nature. It is divided into seven Subseries: 1) Appointment Books; 2) Legal and Financial; 3) Correspondence; 4) Lomax Information; 5) Research Subject Files; 6) Clippings on Lomax; and 7) Death of Louis Lomax.

Series 8, Subseries 1: Appointment books, 1964-1970 (4 folders)

The pages of Lomax’s appointment books found in Series 8, Subseries 1 are irregularly filled with notes scribbled in or with the people’s names, events, and contacts needed mainly for his public appearances. The books for 1969 and 1970 are from his time at Hofstra University.

box
folder
Contents
5
27
Appointment book, 1964, 1965
box
folder
Contents
6
1
Appointment books (Includes listing for 1966), 1967, 1968
6
2
Appointment books (Academic calendars), 1969-1970

Series 8, Subseries 2: Legal and Financial, 1964-1970 (8 folders)

Series 8, Subseries 2 includes information about Lomax’s divorces, he married three times, legal and financial problems he had including his tax indictment in 1970, miscellaneous receipts, as well as legal contracts and agreements he had in his work as a lecturer, book and column writer, and narrator for a Black History Series program recording.

box
folder
Contents
6
3
Divorces and legal documents, 1964-1970
6
4
Legal and financial correspondence, 1966-1967
6
5
Tax Indictment, July 31, 1970
6
6
Miscellaneous receipts, 1966-1968
6
7
Contracts, 1964-1967
6
8
Contracts, 1968-1970
6
9
"Writer-in-Residence" Program, University of Michigan proposal, 1964-1966
6
10
"Louis E. Lomax Black History Series" for Tri-Cassette Programs, Inc., February 7, 1970

Series 8, Subseries 3: Correspondence, 1965-1970 (5 folders)

Lomax correspondence in Series 8, Subseries 3 only covers the years 1965-1970, and does not include any with civil rights era personages. There are very few personal letters. The bulk of the letters concern speaking engagements or other professional concerns.

box
folder
Contents
6
11
Lomax correspondence, 1963
6
12
Lomax correspondence, 1965
6
13
Lomax correspondence, 1966
6
14
Lomax correspondence, 1967
6
15
Lomax correspondence, 1968-1969
6
16
Lomax correspondence, 1970

Series 8, Subseries 4: Lomax Information, 1959-1971

Materials in Series 8, Subseries 4 include items of a more personal nature and which did not fit easily into other series. Included is some information on the Lomax family, Lomax’s political activities with Eugene McCarthy’s run for President, his own run for New York State Assembly, his work at NBC-TV in 1961, and notes about a novel he never completed. It also includes his work for equality at the 1966 White House Conference “To Fulfill These Rights” as well as working with schools and their curriculum on African-American studies. Lomax also received a number of honors, and he was especially proud of his honorary degree of Doctor of Humanities given by Virginia Union University in 1964.

More about the trips Lomax took to the Middle East where he visited Jordan, Israel, and Jerusalem can be found in this series. The 16mm films he took while there can be found in Series 10: Recordings.

During his time in Los Angeles, Lomax was awarded a $100,000 grant to implement a summer project called “Operation Cool-It” that involved 20,000 Los Angeles youths. He incorporated an entity, Louis Lomax Inc., in order to work with the monies.

In many hotels and motels where Lomax stayed, he took the key to his room when he left, as a souvenir of his visit. Consequently, his collection included keys from 23 states, including Washington, D. C., and a number of foreign countries. In many of the states, he stayed at the same motel, sometimes getting the same room on each return visit. The keys, and some other ephemera, including his glasses and case, can be found in Box 18. Included in this subseries are nine plaques which were given to Lomax. They include honors and awards dating from 1963-1967.

box
folder
Contents
6
17
Lomax family information, 1959-1960; 1964
6
18
Blank letterhead for "Pericles, Inc.", circa 1960s
6
19
Political Activities, 1965-1968; undated
6
20
Work at NBC-TV, 1961
6
21
Book: Wayne – novel notes to be rewritten, undated
6
22
First Annual Sojourner Truth Awards program, New York Hilton, April 12, 1964
6
23
Honorary Degree, Virginia Union University, June 6, 1967
6
24
White House Conference "To Fulfill These Rights," Part 1, June 1-2, 1966
6
25
White House Conference "To Fulfill These Rights," Part 2, June 1-2, 1966
6
26
Passports, 1960; 1965
6
27
Notebooks on Middle East Trip, Jordan passport, 1968
6
28
Trip to the Middle East, miscellaneous research materials: Israel, Jerusalem, 1967-1968
box
folder
Contents
7
1
Trip to the Middle East, miscellaneous research materials: Jordan, 1967-1968
7
2
Article on Lomax in Middle East (written in Arabic) from Al-Musawwar, June 24, 1960
7
3
Notes for editing of videotape on Arabs, Israel, undated
7
4
Middle East trip – ephemera, undated
7
5
"Operation Cool-It", trips to Catalina Island, 1966-1967
7
6
"Operation Cool-It" and Louis Lomax, Inc., 1966
7
7
Lomax Inc. financial information, 1966-1967
7
8
Consultations with schools and others on educational changes, 1968; 1970
7
9
Afro-American studies graduate program planning workshop, University of Michigan, April-May 1969
7
10
Miscellaneous, notes, names and contact information, undated
7
11
Honors and recognition, 1963-1964, 1971
7
12
Certificate from Black Student Union of Southern Oregon College, undated
box
Contents
18
Hotel/motel keys and ephemera, undated
box
Contents
9
Plaques (7 items), 1963-1967
box
Item
Contents
17
1
Plaques, 1963
17
2
Plaques, 1965

Series 8, Subseries 5: Research Subject Files, 1960-1970 (28 folders)

Lomax collected articles and other information that he used as background research for his books, articles, commentaries, lectures and, later on, his teaching at Hofstra. Some of the bibliographic information collected would probably have ended up in his projected Afro-American history volumes, which was never completed.

box
folder
Contents
7
13
NAACP, 1960
7
14
Paper: Bontemps, Arna. "The American Negro Writer and his Roots: Selected Papers from the First Conference of Negro Writers, March, 1959. American Society of African Culture, N.Y., 1960", circa 1960
7
15
Bernardi, Gene. "Los Angeles: A Preliminary and Partial Socioeconomic Profile" Committee on Social and Economic Problems, State Social Welfare Board, May 1964
7
16
Newman, Lewis. "Negro Protest in Los Angeles", June 5, 1965
7
17
Watts Riots, 1965-1966
7
18
Blume, Frank R. "The effects of negative and positive pictorial material on judgement of Negroes", 1966
7
19
Civil Rights bill, 1967
7
20
Ghetto, 1967
7
21
Bishop Pike, 1967
7
22
Chapter: Lomas, Charles W. "I am Somebody" in The Agitator in American Society (Prentice-Hall, 1968): 119-135, 1968
7
23
Detroit Riots, Detroit, 1967-1968
7
24
Robert Kennedy Campaign for President, 1968
7
25
Black Olympic Boycott, 1968
7
26
Black movement, Black Power, 1968-1970
7
27
Hate literature, 1968-1970
7
28
"Black Heritage" transcripts, WCBS-TV, July 28, 1969
7
29
Jews and Blacks, 1969
7
30
Baratz, Joan C. and Baratz, Stephen S. "Social pathology mode: Historical bases for psychology's denial of the existence of Negro culture", 1969
7
31
Black writing in the U.S., 1969
7
32
Nixon, Agnew, 1969
7
33
The Chicago "8", Bobbie Seale, etc., 1969-1970
7
34
Black Panthers, 1969-1970
7
35
Civil unrest, 1969-1970
7
36
Universities in America, 1969-1970
7
37
Birth Control, the Pill, and overpopulation, 1969-1970
7
38
Cathlyn Wilkerson and Greenwich Village bombing, 1970
7
39
Edwards, Harry. "Black Museum and Negro Christian Family Relationships," Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, San Jose State College, undated
7
40
Schwartz, Louis P. Slave discipline in Colonial Virginia, submitted for Masters of Arts in the Faculty of Political Science, Columbia University, undated

Series 8, Subseries 6: Scrapbooks and Clippings on Louis Lomax, 1958-1970 (3 folders, 3 volumes)

Lomax maintained articles and clippings about him that appeared in the media. The materials in Subseries 6 cover some of the same information which may be duplicated in many other series dealing with his public appearances or writings, but these have been placed into scrapbooks. The glues do not hold the clippings onto the pages well over the years, so care must be given when using them, particularly for the earliest years.

box
folder
Contents
7
41
"The Wonderful Life of Louis Lomax" in The Pilot, 10(4): 25, May-June 1960
7
42
Newspaper interviews about Lomax, 1960-1970
7
43
Scrapbook, 1970
box
Volume
Contents
16
1
Scrapbook of Thailand trip, 1966-1967
box
Volume
Contents
15
1
Scrapbook, 1958-1967
15
2
Scrapbook, 1963-1965, 1968

Series 8, Subseries 7: Death of Louis Lomax, 1970 (10 folders)

Louis Lomax died in a car accident while in New Mexico on July 30, 1970. Subseries 7 includes newspaper coverage about his unexpected death, his death certificate, and his funeral which was held in Los Angeles, on August 5. His wife, Robinette, received many cards and telegrams of condolence, which are included. Hofstra University also conducted a memorial service on their campus about a week later. An audio recording of the funeral service on reel-to-reel tape is in Series 10: Recordings.

box
folder
Contents
7
44
Death of Lomax clippings, 1970
7
45
Death Certificate; New Mexico Mortuary costs, August 4, 1970; August 1, 1970
box
folder
Contents
8
1
Funeral Service in Los Angeles, August 5, 1970
8
2
Tribute by City of Los Angeles, August, 1970
8
3
Memorial Service at Hofstra University and clippings, August 13, 1970
8
4
Condolence cards for floral arrangements, August 5, 1970
8
5
Condolence cards and letters, pt. 1, August 1970
8
6
Condolence cards and letters, pt. 2, August 1970
8
7
Condolence cards and letters, pt. 3, August 1970
8
8
Condolence telegrams, August 1970

Series 9: Robinette Kirk Lomax, 1970-1973 (11 folders)

Due to his high profile in the media, being black, and speaking out about racial injustice and civil rights through the years, some believed that Lomax could have been killed for reasons other than a straightforward highway accident. His widow, Robinette, was one of those caught up in the possible conspiracy and launched a wrongful death court case against the Ford Corporation, as well as contacting psychic Peter Hurkos.

Robinette had an interracial marriage to Lomax and was his third wife. She had two children by a former marriage living with her at home, Robin and Billy, and had served as Lomax’s administrative assistant before they married in 1968. She was deeply involved in her husband’s affairs while he lived. In order to honor her husband’s memory, Robinette proposed having a Louis Lomax Chair at the Claremont Colleges in Pomona, California. Her work with the Louis Lomax Memorial Collection at Hofstra University can be found in Series 7. Miscellaneous materials belonging to Robinette or about her children are also included.

box
folder
Contents
8
9
Contact with psychic Peter Hurkos after Lomax death, August 27, 1970
8
10
Wrongful death court case, 1970-1971
8
11
Death Benefits settlement, 1970-1971
8
12
Correspondence of Robinette Lomax, 1970-1972
8
13
Blank stationary, undated
8
14
Louis Lomax Chair proposal at the Claremont Colleges, 1971
8
15
Congressional Black Caucus Inaugural National banquet, June 18, 1971
8
16
Writings of Robinette Lomax, circa 1971
8
17
Notepads kept by Robinette with notes on contacts, events, draft correspondence and n her family, circa 1970-1973
8
18
Robinette's children, Robin and Billy Kirk, undated
8
19
Magazine issues saved, 1971-1973

Series 10: Recordings, 1961-1970 4.5 cubic feet

Lomax recorded many of the speeches and talks he gave to outside groups as well as a number of the lectures he gave at Hofstra or as a series to other academics. The bulk of the recordings are on reel-to-reel tapes. There are 94 reel-to-reel tapes which range from 1961 to 1971, and include the last lecture he gave at Hofstra before his death in July 1970. Of the 94 tapes, 64 have identifications which include the event and a date, sometimes the recording speed. The other 30 may have event information but no date, or even less information but some sort of notation on the boxes. The Lomax funeral service in 1970 is included. The collection includes one large professional-sized audio recording of the interviews with John Rousselot and Ron Karenga, noted as produced by Lomax Productions, which would be while Lomax was working with KTTV in Los Angeles. None of the recordings have been reviewed due to their format. It is possible that some are copies made later of an earlier event, may be duplicates, or may just continue into additional parts which aren't noted on the covers. However, the lack of information on the boxes creates more questions than answers.

The reel-to-reel tapes are organized by year from 1961-1970, followed by the tapes which have some identification but are not dated. Those with limited information on the boxes complete that run. The large professional Lomax Productions tape is located in Box 13 with the others in Boxes 9, 10, 11 and 14.

There are 11 unidentified cassette tapes. It is most likely that these are lectures given and recorded by Lomax in the classrooms at Hofstra. A few begin with a voice giving the date but, due to the recording quality and the lack of personally worn microphones being used, it is not always easy to understand what is being said and by whom.

Included in this series in Box 13 is a Stenorette tape recorder, foot pedal, Stenorette battery charger, and ear buds used by Lomax. Also in this box are three dictating cassettes, one Stenorette tape marked “Bradley” on the box, and the 11 cassette tapes.

The Lomax materials include 17-16mm film reels, many of which are not well marked. However, it is likely from the information on some of the reels that the footage was taken by or for Lomax when he toured the Middle East in 1968. In March 1968, Lomax quit his job at KTTV Channel 11 and married his third wife, Robinette. They took an extended honeymoon to Israel and Europe before he began teaching at Hofstra University. According to a March 21, 1968 item in Jet magazine, Lomax resigned “to honor commitments with the motion picture industry to write screenplays, but agreed to do special projects for the station.” It is not known if the footage taken was for one of those special projects for the station or if the footage turned into a final product.

box
Reel
Contents
11
1
Dr. Louis E. Lomax Address, Albany State College, Part 1, October 1968
11
2
Dr. Louis E. Lomax Address, Albany State College, Part 2, October 1968
11
3
The Negro in American History & Culture, November 1968
11
4
University Forum, University of Texas, El Paso, March 1969
11
5
Lecture #1: Shelter Rock School, Manhasset, New York, October 1969
11
6
Lecture #2: Hofstra - Manhasset, October1969
11
7
Lecture #3: Guest Lecturer - Manhasset, October 1969
11
8
Lomax Lecture, October 1969
11
9
University Club, New York City
11
10
HU Luncheon in NYC; Address given at Vietnam Moratorium, October 1969; November 1969
11
11
Louis Lomax, November 1969
11
12
Louis Lomax, November 1969
11
13
Lomax Lecture, December 1969
11
14
Final Lomax Lecture, December 1969
11
15
Louis Lomax - Lane Community College, March 1969
11
16
Modesto Junior College, "The Negro Revolt", May 1964
11
17
Blue Ribbon, April 1970
11
18
Spread the Word - The Story of Louis Lomax, December 1970
11
19
Blue Ribbon, April 1970
11
20
Blue Ribbon, April 1970
11
21
Lecture #1: Shelter Rock School, Manhasset, New York (Reel #1), October 1969
11
22
Lecture #1: Shelter Rock School, Manhasset, New York (Reel #2), October 1969
11
23
Lecture #1: Shelter Rock School, Manhasset, New York (Reel #3), October 1969
11
24
Lecture #2: Hofstra - Manhasset
11
25
Lecture #2: Hofstra - Manhasset
11
26
Lecture #3: Guest Lecturer, Octobe 1969
box
Reel
Contents
10
1
"The Spiritual's Many Faces", September 1961
10
2
"The American University: Reluctant Liberalism in Action", Hartford College, March 1963
10
3
"Another Century, Another Faith"; "A Tale of Three Cities" - College of Texas, December 1963
10
4
Speech for the Greater Community Baptist Church, Pacoima, CA; Congregational Church, Woodland Hills, CA ; Santa Monica City College, October 1963; May 1964; March 1964
10
5
WEEI Boston, Massachusetts, January 1964
10
6
WEEI Boston, Massachusetts, January 1964
10
7
WSA Symposium, Feburary 1964
10
8
"Where Are We?" Pomona College, Claremont, California, February 1964
10
9
"Where Are We?" Pomona College, Claremont Colleges, February 1964
10
10
Swander Foundation Lecture (Reel 1), April 1964
10
11
Swander Foundation Lecture (Reel 2), April 1964
10
12
Swander Foundation Lecture (Reel 3), April 1964
10
13
Swander Foundation Lecture, April 1964
10
14
Lomax at UMD, May 1964
10
15
Mr. Louis E. Lomax, taped at AIC, May 1964
10
16
"The Negro Revolt", Modesto Junior College, May 1964
10
17
"The Negro Revolt", Modesto Junior College, May 1964
10
18
"The Negro Revolt", Modesto Junior College, May 1964
10
19
Louis Lomax Lecture, May 1964
10
20
Louis Lomax "The Negro Revolt" (Copy), November 1964
10
21
The Nonwhite Revolt: Christianity in Crisis, December 1964
10
22
Pontiac Urban League Dinner - For Dr. Lomax from the Jefferson Jr. High School, Pontiac, Michigan, March 1965
10
23
"The Negro Revolt Revisited", November 1965
10
24
"Negro Revolt Revisited", Carleton College Convocation, October 1965
10
25
Lomax - U[nitarian] Church, San Francisco, November 1965
10
26
"Negro Revolt Revisited", Carleton College Convocation, Skinner Memorial Chapel, October 1965
10
27
"Negro Revolt Revisited", Carleton College Convocation, Skinner Memorial Chapel, October 1965
10
28
"Negro Revolt Revisited", Carleton College Convocation, Skinner Memorial Chapel, October 1965
box
Reel
Contents
12
1
Hofstra Lecture #2: Manhasset (Reel 3)
12
2
Spread the Word - The Story of Louis Lomax, December 1970
12
3
Louis Lomax, November 1969
12
4
Hofstra American Studies: Langston Hughes; Expanding what was read-evening class, 1970
12
5
Classroom - Hofstra U; Second Semester Industrial Revolution, 1970
12
6
Classroom at Hofstra, Long Island, New York, 1970
12
7
Second Re-Construction (Probably Hofstra), 1969-1970
12
8
Second Re-Construction (Probably Hofstra), 1969-1970
12
9
Louis Lomax Memorial Service, August 1970
12
10
Louis Lomax Memorial Service (copy), August 1970
12
11
Bundy 2, No date
12
12
Cambodia and [Cleaver?]
12
13
Lomax in Cambodia, [Inclusion?] by U.S., no date
12
14
No. 1 in Bangkok
12
15
No. 2 in Bangkok, no date
12
16
No. 3 in Bangkok and in Nakae, Ban Pla Park, Koot Ta Kai, Nakorn Panom, no date
12
17
4, Presentation
12
18
Lomax Speech Tape, 1960
12
19
Sid Woods, no date
12
20
Lomax, Racism - A Symptom of Moral Breakdown in the Metropolis
12
21
Oakland, California - "The Central City"
12
22
Oakland City College, Oakland, California
12
23
Louis Lomax at Urban League
12
24
Louis Lomax at Urban League
12
25
Unitarian Community Forum Series, San Francisco, Negro Revolt Revisited
12
26
Unitarian community Forum Series, San Francisco, Negro Revolt Revisited
box
Reel
Contents
13
1
Lomax Productions: John Rousellot Interview; Ron Karenga Interview, undated
13
"Stenorette" tape recorder, foot pedal, "Stenorette" battery charger, ear buds, undated
13
2
"Stenorette" tape recording marked "Bradley", undated
13
Dictating cassettes (3), undated
13
Cassette tapes, probably Lomax lectures at Hofstra (11), undated
box
Reel
Contents
14
1
"Sound track of Malcolm X", undated
14
2
Marge Meoli, Doris Hughes Recording, no date
14
3
Tape of "A T.V. Show Relating to Black Culture", May 1964
14
4
Jack Johnson, Lomax #1 Interview; James Brown; Malcolm X; Message to Grass Root
14
5
Lomax [KBLA?]
14
6
Bill & Margaret's Tape of Horton-Johnson Wedding
14
7
Sena Home Int., no date
14
8
"3 3/4", no date
14
9
"3 3/4", no date
14
10
"3 3/4", no date
14
11
Lomax, no date
14
12
A-2, no date
14
13
B-1, no date
Reel
Contents
1-17
Film reels, circa 1968